×

Warning

JUser: :_load: Unable to load user with ID: 3719
Tuesday, 07 December 2010 17:40

Pre-natal mobile phone use leads to naughty kids

By

Danish research has identified a potential link between mobile phone use by pregnant mums and their children, linking this to the development of behavioural problems. According to the study, children exposed to mobile phones before birth and who used phones before the age of 7 were 50% more likely to have behavioural problems, while those who were exposed to mobile phones only before birth had a 40% increased likelihood of behavioural problems.

The study, published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ran from March 1996 to November 2002. It followed nearly 100,000 pregnant mothers who completed a detailed questionnaire on lifestyle factors, dietary habits and environmental exposures. When their children were seven years old, they were questioned again on information pertaining to the health of her child, cell phone use among children as well as among the mother's during pregnancy.

The study found that 'There is an association between prenatal as well as postnatal use and behavioural problems by age 7 years among a general population of mothers who are cell phone users. These results replicate the findings of an association observed among only early technology adopters. These new results also reduce the likelihood that these are chance findings or findings that did not adequately consider the influence of other important factors for behavioural problems. These results should not be interpreted as demonstrating a causal link between cell phone use and adverse health effects for children, but if real - and given the nearly universal use of cell phones - the impact on the public's health could be of concern.'

In other words, there is a correlation but not necessarily a causal effect.

Professor Rodney Croft, Executive Director of the Australian Centre for Radio Frequency Bioeffects Research and a Professor of Health Psychology at the University of Wollongong, said that "Although this new study is interesting in that it reports greater behavioural problems in 7-year-olds whose mothers reported more mobile phone use during pregnancy (than in those who reported less mobile phone use), the data is not strong enough to indicate that prenatal mobile phone exposure causes behavioural problems in children'. Professor Croft's main concern is that the nature of the study relied on parental 'parental recall of mobile phone use' and that this may not have been particularly accurate or measurable.

From the other side of the world, Professor Patricia McKinney, Emeritus Professor of Paediatric Epidemiology at the University of Leeds, said that "The conclusions from this large study, associating behavioural problems in very young children with mobile phone use, over-interpret the results.  There is no scientific basis for investigating exposure of the growing baby when pregnant mothers use a mobile phone, as exposure to radio-frequency radiation from mobile phones is highly localised to the part of the head closest to the phone; there is no evidence to suggest that other parts of the body, such as the abdomen where the baby is growing, are affected by mobile phone use'.

Similarly Professor David Spiegelhalter, Professor of Biostatistics at the University of Cambridge, said he was 'skeptical of these results'.


Subscribe to ITWIRE UPDATE Newsletter here

Now’s the Time for 400G Migration

The optical fibre community is anxiously awaiting the benefits that 400G capacity per wavelength will bring to existing and future fibre optic networks.

Nearly every business wants to leverage the latest in digital offerings to remain competitive in their respective markets and to provide support for fast and ever-increasing demands for data capacity. 400G is the answer.

Initial challenges are associated with supporting such project and upgrades to fulfil the promise of higher-capacity transport.

The foundation of optical networking infrastructure includes coherent optical transceivers and digital signal processing (DSP), mux/demux, ROADM, and optical amplifiers, all of which must be able to support 400G capacity.

With today’s proprietary power-hungry and high cost transceivers and DSP, how is migration to 400G networks going to be a viable option?

PacketLight's next-generation standardised solutions may be the answer. Click below to read the full article.

CLICK HERE!

WEBINAR PROMOTION ON ITWIRE: It's all about webinars

These days our customers Advertising & Marketing campaigns are mainly focussed on webinars.

If you wish to promote a Webinar we recommend at least a 2 week campaign prior to your event.

The iTWire campaign will include extensive adverts on our News Site itwire.com and prominent Newsletter promotion https://www.itwire.com/itwire-update.html and Promotional News & Editorial.

This coupled with the new capabilities 5G brings opens up huge opportunities for both network operators and enterprise organisations.

We have a Webinar Business Booster Pack and other supportive programs.

We look forward to discussing your campaign goals with you.

MORE INFO HERE!

BACK TO HOME PAGE

Share News tips for the iTWire Journalists? Your tip will be anonymous

WEBINARS ONLINE & ON-DEMAND

GUEST ARTICLES

VENDOR NEWS

Guest Opinion

Guest Interviews

Guest Reviews

Guest Research

Guest Research & Case Studies

Channel News

Comments