Home Your Tech Entertainment Entertainment Sony adds 'hi-fi' option to music subscription service

Sony adds 'hi-fi' option to music subscription service

Sony has extended its Music Unlimited streaming service with the option of 320kbps AAC streaming.

Music Unlimited is part of the Sony Entertainment Network and offers 18 million songs, though not all of them are available everywhere due to the usual rights issues.

Subscribers listening to the music on Windows or OS X based computers, Android smartphones or tablets, the Sony Android Walkman or the PlayStation 3 are now able to select high quality streaming to receive 320kbps AAC streams.

That should give an appreciable improvement over the default 48kbps HE-AAC stream, particularly when listening via home entertainment gear. But it does come at a significant cost in terms of data usage, so it's probably best to stick to the default on your smartphone or tablet.

Other devices that support Music Unlimited but do not get the high quality option include certain Blu-ray players and home theatre systems, Sony Bravia and Internet TVs, the PlayStation Portable and Vita, and iOS devices.

Subscriptions cost $7.99 per month (Mac, Windows and PS3 only) or $12.99 for premium access via any supported device. A 14-day free trial is offered.

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Stephen Withers

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Stephen Withers is one of Australia¹s most experienced IT journalists, having begun his career in the days of 8-bit 'microcomputers'. He covers the gamut from gadgets to enterprise systems. In previous lives he has been an academic, a systems programmer, an IT support manager, and an online services manager. Stephen holds an honours degree in Management Sciences and a PhD in Industrial and Business Studies.