Home The Linux Distillery Mozilla joins Microsoft in slamming Google Chrome Frame

Author's Opinion

The views in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of iTWire.

Have your say and comment below.

Microsoft has found an unexpected ally in its condemnation of Chrome Frame, a plugin by Google that switches out the Internet Explorer HTML and JavaScipt engines for those used by the Chrome web browser. Now Firefox maker Mozilla has spoken out.

Google’s engineers working on Google Wave, the next-gen e-mail/IM/wiki/blog all-in-one replacement, had enough of Internet Explorer, they claimed.

They said Internet Explorer was just now fast enough or sufficiently compliant with HTML 5 standards. Consequently, the Googlites found they were expending a lot of effort to make Google Wave perform well in Internet Explorer.

It struck the Google team that enough was enough; all that extra work could be better spent on developing Google Wave’s core features for everyone and so Chrome Frame was born – an open source plugin for Internet Explorer that effectively replaces the rendering and JavaScript engines with those used by Google’s own Chrome web browser.

By installing Chrome Frame Internet Explorer users can continue using the web browser they prefer, or are constrained to use by corporate policy, but yet still experience Google Wave the same way a Chrome user would.

Tests performed by Computerworld show Internet Explorer 8 runs JavaScript 10 times faster using Chrome Frame than without it.

Yet, Microsoft slammed Chrome Frame as making Internet Explorer less secure. Chrome Frame bypasses Internet Explorer 8’s enhanced security features, Microsoft said, and called Chrome Frame “a risk” that they would not recommend.

Now Mozilla has joined the fray with Mike Shaver, Vice President for Engineering, and Mozilla Foundation Chairperson Mitchell Baker both giving their views.

Mozilla’s line is that Google’s approach is the wrong one. Inserting another browser into Internet Explorer doesn’t achieve the unification Google want but instead weakens the security and causes a messy browser soup.

Users will lose control over what used to be their browser, Baker said.

FREE SEMINAR

Site24x7 Seminars

Deliver Better User Experience in Today's Era of Digital Transformation

Some IT problems are better solved from the cloud

Join us as we discuss how DevOps in combination with AIOps can assure a seamless user experience, and assist you in monitoring all your individual IT components—including your websites, services, network infrastructure, and private or public clouds—from a single, cloud-based dashboard.

Sydney 7th May 2019

Melbourne 09 May 2019

Don’t miss out! Register Today!

REGISTER HERE!

LEARN HOW TO REDUCE YOUR RISK OF A CYBER ATTACK

Australia is a cyber espionage hot spot.

As we automate, script and move to the cloud, more and more businesses are reliant on infrastructure that has the high potential to be exposed to risk.

It only takes one awry email to expose an accounts’ payable process, and for cyber attackers to cost a business thousands of dollars.

In the free white paper ‘6 Steps to Improve your Business Cyber Security’ you’ll learn some simple steps you should be taking to prevent devastating and malicious cyber attacks from destroying your business.

Cyber security can no longer be ignored, in this white paper you’ll learn:

· How does business security get breached?
· What can it cost to get it wrong?
· 6 actionable tips

DOWNLOAD NOW!

David M Williams

David has been computing since 1984 where he instantly gravitated to the family Commodore 64. He completed a Bachelor of Computer Science degree from 1990 to 1992, commencing full-time employment as a systems analyst at the end of that year. David subsequently worked as a UNIX Systems Manager, Asia-Pacific technical specialist for an international software company, Business Analyst, IT Manager, and other roles. David has been the Chief Information Officer for national public companies since 2007, delivering IT knowledge and business acumen, seeking to transform the industries within which he works. David is also involved in the user group community, the Australian Computer Society technical advisory boards, and education.

 

Popular News

 

Telecommunications

 

Guest Opinion

 

Sponsored News

 

 

 

 

Connect