Home Telecoms & NBN Telstra's use of FttC for NBN connections approved
Telstra's use of FttC for NBN connections approved Featured

Telstra's variation to the NBN migration plan, using fibre-to-the-curb in addition to other technologies, has been granted approval by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.

The plan outlines steps that Telstra will take to migrate voice and broadband services from its existing copper and hybrid-fibre coaxial networks to the NBN. The variation was proposed by Telstra in October 2017.

The terms fibre-to-the-distribution-point and fibre-to-the-curb have been used interchangeably when stories about the NBN have appeared, but there is a difference, as was pointed out to iTWire some time ago by Mark Gregory, associate professor in network engineering at RMIT.

He pointed out in July last year that in the case of FttDP, the length of copper that formed the last bit of the connection was typically less than 40 metres.

In the case of FttC, it was a variation of fibre-to-the-node where fibre was rolled out to within 300 to 400 metres of premises to either a pit or pole, and copper cables used for the lead-in.

The ACCC said today that, in response to a discussion paper released in December, NBN stakeholders had identified problems with the connection processes outlined by the NBN Co.

“The proposed connection processes could have resulted in people being left without a phone or Internet service before their FttC service was operating,” ACCC chairman Rod Sims said.

“NBN Co have now agreed to change connection processes and undertake data testing to ensure FttC services are operating prior to disconnection of existing services.”

“The ACCC welcomes these improvements, which should provide a safeguard against consumers being disconnected before they have access to a working NBN service.”

The ACCC said NBN Co would also notify FttC customers that they had up to 18 months to switch to the NBN before their phone and Internet services were disconnected.

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Sam Varghese has been writing for iTWire since 2006, a year after the sitecame into existence. For nearly a decade thereafter, he wrote mostly about free and open source software, based on his own use of this genre of software. Since May 2016, he has been writing across many areas of technology. He has been a journalist for nearly 40 years in India (Indian Express and Deccan Herald), the UAE (Khaleej Times) and Australia (Daily Commercial News (now defunct) and The Age). His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.

 

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