Home Strategy AIIA urges govt not to stuff up CDR regulatory framework
Ron Gauci: “There is a real risk that inadequate stakeholder engagement and rushed implementation will result in an ambiguous and complex CDR regulatory framework." Ron Gauci: “There is a real risk that inadequate stakeholder engagement and rushed implementation will result in an ambiguous and complex CDR regulatory framework." Supplied

The Australian Information Industry Association says its members are opposed to the imposition of a template for the proposed consumer data rights regulatory framework that is designed to suit the banking and energy sectors.

In a statement, the advocacy group called on the Federal Government to work with industry and consumers to draft the proposed framework.

The CDR Bill 2019 is meant to create an extensive regulatory framework for sharing consumer data across industry sectors. It was introduced into the House of Representatives in February and referred to the Senate Economics and Legislation Committee for inquiry and a report by 18 March.

AIIA chief executive Ron Gauci said: “AIIA members support the establishment of a CDR regulatory framework that protects consumer data while fostering innovation in the telecommunications sector. However, AIIA members do not support the imposition of a CDR ‘template’ that is developed to suit the characteristics of the banking and energy sectors.

"Our members are clear on the need for a telecommunications-specific template."

He said there was a risk that lack of stakeholder engagement and rushed implementation would create an ambiguous and complex CDR regulatory framework.

"This could potentially create an unnecessary and onerous compliance burden for the different industry sectors and alienate consumers," Gauci said.

“The CDR initiative is just one example of where Government legislation and regulatory frameworks struggle to keep pace with technology-led business change and innovation. Therefore, we urge the Government, consumers and the telecommunication industry to work together to co-design a clear and trusted CDR regulatory framework.”

The AIIA has recommended:

  • The implementation of the CDR regulatory framework should include iterative review points.
  • Data collected and lessons learnt from the review points should be incorporated into the regulatory frameworks for the energy and telecommunications sectors of the economy.
  • These reviews should include consideration of technological advancements and the adequacy of existing regulatory frameworks that already apply to the telecommunication sector.

The bill will be debated in Parliament in April and, if passed, will come into force from 1 July.

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Sam Varghese has been writing for iTWire since 2006, a year after the sitecame into existence. For nearly a decade thereafter, he wrote mostly about free and open source software, based on his own use of this genre of software. Since May 2016, he has been writing across many areas of technology. He has been a journalist for nearly 40 years in India (Indian Express and Deccan Herald), the UAE (Khaleej Times) and Australia (Daily Commercial News (now defunct) and The Age). His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.

 

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