Home Security Trend Micro patches email gateway, but leaves two flaws unpatched

Trend Micro patches email gateway, but leaves two flaws unpatched

Trend Micro has patched 10 vulnerabilities in its Email Encryption Gateway product that could be used for remote exploits, but left two others unpatched.

The vulnerabilities were discovered by the security firm Core Security which released its own report on them alongside Trend Micro's bulletin. Core Security has also release proof-of-concept code for these vulnerabilities.

The following issues were patched:

CVE-2018-6219: Insecure Update via HTTP (CVSS 7.5).

CVE-2018-6220: Arbitrary file write leading to command execution (CVSS 7.5).

CVE-2018-6221: Unvalidated Software Updates (CVSS 7.5).

CVE-2018-6222: Arbitrary logs locations leading to command execution (CVSS 7.2).

CVE-2018-6223: Missing authentication for appliance registration (CVSS 9.1).

CVE-2018-6225: XML external entity injection in a configuration script (CVSS 5.5).

CVE-2018-6226: Reflected cross-site scripting in two configuration scripts (CVSS 7.4).

CVE-2018-6227: Stored cross-site scripting in a policy script (CVSS 7.4).

CVE-2018-6228: SQL injection in a policy script (CVSS 4.9).

CVE-2018-6229: SQL injection in an edit policy script (CVSS 6.5).

The two unpatched flaws were:

CVE-2018-6224: Lack of cross-site request forgery protection (CVSS 6.8).

CVE-2018-6230: SQL injection in a search configuration script (CVSS 3.8).

Regarding these two vulnerabilities, Trend Micro made the following observations:

"CVE-2018-6224 (Lack of cross-site request forgery protection) - it was reported that this vulnerability could be chained with at least three other vulnerabilities listed above to lead to remote command execution. The latest TMEEG build addresses the three other vulnerabilities, which should negate the ability to attain remote command execution using this vulnerability.

"In addition, for both CVE-2018-6224 and CVS-2018-6230 (SQL injection in a search configuration script) - the affected components are located in the TMEEG Web console, which by design is not generally Internet-facing and is usually configured for the administrator to only access within the intranet. A recommendation to help mitigate exposure and exploit risk is to ensure that the Web console is secured on the intranet only and with limited access (e.g. assign allowed-access network segment via IP range for example)."


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Sam Varghese

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A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.