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Vault 7: Documents detail implants for stealing SSH traffic Featured

WikiLeaks has released CIA documents detailing implants that can be used to steal traffic from SSH sessions on both Windows and Linux systems, in the latest dump from its Vault 7 stash.

The implant for Windows is called BothanSpy and targets versions 3,4 and 5 of the SSH client Xshell. It dates back to 2015. The Linux implant is known as Gyrfalcon and is aimed at OpenSSH; it dates back to 2013.

SSH is a program used to log into another computer over a network, to execute commands in a remote machine, and to move files from one machine to another. It provides strong authentication and secure communications over insecure channels.

OpenSSH is a free implementation of SSH developed by the OpenBSD project. It is widely believed to be the most popular SSH client.

BothanSpy can steal either username/password combinations or username, filename of private SSH key and key password if public key authentication is used.

The stolen credentials can be exfiltrated to a CIA-controlled server.It is installed as a Shellterm 3.x extension on the target machine.

The manual says that BothanSpy will work only if Xshell is running on the target, and it has active sessions. Else, Xshell will not be storing credential information in the location that BothanSpy is programmed to search.

In what appears to be  an attempt at humour, the manual also states that BothanSpy "does not destroy the Death Star, nor does it detect traps laid by The Emperor to destroy Rebel fleets".

In the case of the Linux implant, it can do all that the Windows implant does and also collect full or partial traffic of an OpenSSH session. It is installed using a CIA-developed rootkit called JQC/KitV.

The manual describes Gyrfalcon as a library loaded into the OpenSSH client process address space on Linux platforms. Users are required to have detailed knowledge of the various shells on Linux systems and also be adept at using the command line.

Any prospective attacker is also required to know how to gain root privileges in order to install the implant. However Gyrfalcon itself can be run with user permissions.

The implant runs on older versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Debian, Ubuntu, SUSE and CentOS.

WikiLeaks began dumping the Vault 7 stash on 7 March and claims that it is the biggest ever leak of CIA documents.

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Sam Varghese

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Sam Varghese has been writing for iTWire since 2006, a year after the sitecame into existence. For nearly a decade thereafter, he wrote mostly about free and open source software, based on his own use of this genre of software. Since May 2016, he has been writing across many areas of technology. He has been a journalist for nearly 40 years in India (Indian Express and Deccan Herald), the UAE (Khaleej Times) and Australia (Daily Commercial News (now defunct) and The Age). His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.

 

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