Home opinion-and-analysis Open Sauce SLUG to operate as sub-committee of LA

SLUG to operate as sub-committee of LA

The Sydney Linux User Group (SLUG) has voted to wind itself up and instead operate as a sub-committee of Linux Australia, the umbrella group for LUGs in the country.

At an extraordinary general body meeting on March 25, SLUG members voted for resolutions to end the group's separate existence, donate its surplus property and funds to LA and function as a sub-committee of LA.

In preparation for this, LA has modified its sub-committee policies.

Linux Australia president John Ferlito told iTWire that the process was not yet complete.

"Not quite," he said when asked whether SLUG had already become a sub-committee of LA. "SLUG voted at their EGM to wind down SLUG as an organisation and apply to become a sub-committee of LA.

"This was successful but they haven't as yet officially asked LA to become a sub-committee."

The move to dissolve SLUG as a separate entity was driven by SLUG president, James Polley, because "...in the main we end up merely duplicating work and expenses that Linux Australia does".

 

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Sam Varghese

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A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.