Home opinion-and-analysis Open Sauce OpenSolaris fork to be announced

A month after Oracle announced that it would be no longer supporting the OpenSolaris project and concentrating its energies on Solaris 11, a group is set to announce a fork of the canned project.


Project OpenIndiana says it was conceived during the period after Oracle took over Sun Microsystems and uncertainty prevailed about the future of OpenSolaris, a community project that was begun by Sun in 2005 as a means to encourage developers outside the company to contribute to development.

The formal announcement of the launch of Project OpenIndiana will be made tomorrow (September 14, UK time), nicely timed to take place about a week ahead of Oracle's OpenWorld conference in the US.

OpenIndiana distribution manager Alasdair Lumsden, makes this plain, writing on one of the project's mailing lists: "Oracle OpenWorld is on September 19th and it's likely they'll announce Solaris 11 Express at this. In order to capture as much market attention and have people start using the distribution, we absolutely must get our distro out the door before hand.

"I've set 15th September 2010 as the very last date we can do this by - ideally by this point we should have:  Our 147 build completed and in a public IPS repo; a functional website up at http://openindiana.org; all the showstopper bugs at https://bugs.launchpad.net/openindiana fixed."

The OpenIndiana project's other mailing list has been active since July.

On August 13, a leaked memo from Oracle said it would only provide releases of package updates for OpenSolaris under the same licence (the CDDL or Common Development and Distribution Licence) for future releases of Solaris 11 Express. No new development would take place.

Project OpenIndiana derives its name from the original set-up, which was known as Project Indiana. It will be based on Illumos, the kernel and foundation from OpenSolaris.

"OpenIndiana is part of the Illumos Foundation, and provides a true open source community alternative to Solaris 11 and Solaris 11 Express, with an open development model and full community participation," its website says.

Despite the fact that Sun adopted a restrictive policy towards OpenSolaris, the project managed to produce a number of good releases. Oracle's focus was the money-generating parts of what it bought and hence the project was given the heave-ho a little less than seven months after the purchase of Sun was completed.

FREE SEMINAR

Site24x7 Seminars

Deliver Better User Experience in Today's Era of Digital Transformation

Some IT problems are better solved from the cloud

Join us as we discuss how DevOps in combination with AIOps can assure a seamless user experience, and assist you in monitoring all your individual IT components—including your websites, services, network infrastructure, and private or public clouds—from a single, cloud-based dashboard.

Sydney 7th May 2019

Melbourne 09 May 2019

Don’t miss out! Register Today!

REGISTER HERE!

LEARN HOW TO REDUCE YOUR RISK OF A CYBER ATTACK

Australia is a cyber espionage hot spot.

As we automate, script and move to the cloud, more and more businesses are reliant on infrastructure that has the high potential to be exposed to risk.

It only takes one awry email to expose an accounts’ payable process, and for cyber attackers to cost a business thousands of dollars.

In the free white paper ‘6 Steps to Improve your Business Cyber Security’ you’ll learn some simple steps you should be taking to prevent devastating and malicious cyber attacks from destroying your business.

Cyber security can no longer be ignored, in this white paper you’ll learn:

· How does business security get breached?
· What can it cost to get it wrong?
· 6 actionable tips

DOWNLOAD NOW!

Sam Varghese

website statistics

Sam Varghese has been writing for iTWire since 2006, a year after the sitecame into existence. For nearly a decade thereafter, he wrote mostly about free and open source software, based on his own use of this genre of software. Since May 2016, he has been writing across many areas of technology. He has been a journalist for nearly 40 years in India (Indian Express and Deccan Herald), the UAE (Khaleej Times) and Australia (Daily Commercial News (now defunct) and The Age). His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.

 

Popular News

 

Telecommunications

 

Guest Opinion

 

Sponsored News

 

 

 

 

Connect