Home Open Source Software Freedom Day event in Melbourne on 16 Sept

Software Freedom Day event in Melbourne on 16 Sept

Free Software Melbourne, a collaboration between regional free software activist groups in Australia, will organise a function on 16 September to mark Software Freedom Day.

Held in conjunction with local Linux user group, Linux Users of Victoria, the event will begin at noon at the Electron Workshop co-working space at 31, Arden Street, North Melbourne.

A statement from the organisers said: "It's that... time of the year we look at how we might keep our increasingly digital lives under our our own control and prevent prying eyes from seeing things they shouldn't."

Software Freedom Day is marked around the world with various groups drawing attention to free and open source software which is meant to guarantee the freedom of users.

At the Melbourne event, some of the speakers include Jon Lawrence of Electronic Frontiers Australia; Peter Serwylo of the online F-Droid free software store, and Andrew Pam of LUV.

There will be networking opportunities, introductions to local technology groups and a Linux installfest.

Entry is free and the event will end at 6pm.

Image: courtesy Red Hat

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Sam Varghese

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A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.