Friday, 02 September 2016 23:07

It’s official: Samsung stops sales of Galaxy Note7, will replace, repair or refund Featured

By

What was prematurely derided by some as mere "clickbait" is anything but, given Samsung has now officially halted Note7 sales.

iTWire first covered this breaking story yesterday in two articles, entitled 'Explosion reports: Samsung may recall Note7 devices’ and ‘Is the Samsung Galaxy Note7 smoking hot? Exploding batteries say yes!’.

While the news of exploding batteries was met with claims of mere "clickbait" by some around the world, as always, a blogger or journalist doing their job will do more than scream "clickbait" and will actually investigate the issue as best they can from their keyboards – unless, of course, they happen to be on the ground in the countries concerned where battery explosions occurred, whatever their cause, to investigate in person.

Contacting the company concerned for comment also helps, whether it has been done by others as yet or not. You never know what the response will be. 

In any case, as you’ll see below, Samsung states it “conducted a thorough investigation and found a battery cell issue,” which presumably is that very cause. 

So, what is the full Samsung Electronics Australia statement?

The statement issued on Friday evening reads: “Samsung is committed to producing the highest quality products and we take every incident report from our valued customers very seriously. In response to recently reported cases of the new Galaxy Note7, we conducted a thorough investigation and found a battery cell issue.

“To date (as of September 1) there have been 35 cases that have been reported globally. There have no reported incidents in Australia. However, because our customers’ safety is an absolute priority at Samsung, we have stopped sales of the Galaxy Note7.

“For customers who already have Galaxy Note7 devices, we will provide a resolution of their choice including a replacement, repair or refund over the coming weeks.

“We acknowledge the inconvenience this may cause in the market but this is to ensure that Samsung continues to deliver the highest quality products to our customers. We are working closely with our partners to ensure the customer experience is as convenient and efficient as possible. We will have an update for Australian customers early next week,” the statement concluded.

News reports online say the action is global, with the same reports dubbing it a "recall".

Now you know. Presumably the reason for the delay of "the coming weeks" listed above is because Samsung will need to continue its checks to ensure future Note7s coming out of the factory are free of the battery cell issue or any other issue that could cause a recall.

All eyes will now firmly be on how fast Samsung can safely rectify the issue and repair/replace/refund all those Note7 owners worldwide, with Reuters reporting from a Sasmung source that sales number 2.5 million.

However, this number apparently does not include devices in stock or in transit for stores worldwide, which will add to Samsung’s troubles in returning to sales as quickly as possible.

That said, all eyes will also be closely following what issues might appear with Apple’s iPhone 7, with iPhones certainly having their share of antenna bands, maps, flickering screens, bendable cases and other issues in the past.

There always seems to be something conflated into a global conspiracy when it comes to Apple, even though none of those cases resulted in global recalls.

So, the next time anyone is inclined to cry "clickbait", they might want to do some additional research first, because you never know if the issue is real, or not, until further investigations have been done by the manufacturer itself, whoever that might be.

SAMSUNG RECALL


Subscribe to ITWIRE UPDATE Newsletter here

Now’s the Time for 400G Migration

The optical fibre community is anxiously awaiting the benefits that 400G capacity per wavelength will bring to existing and future fibre optic networks.

Nearly every business wants to leverage the latest in digital offerings to remain competitive in their respective markets and to provide support for fast and ever-increasing demands for data capacity. 400G is the answer.

Initial challenges are associated with supporting such project and upgrades to fulfil the promise of higher-capacity transport.

The foundation of optical networking infrastructure includes coherent optical transceivers and digital signal processing (DSP), mux/demux, ROADM, and optical amplifiers, all of which must be able to support 400G capacity.

With today’s proprietary power-hungry and high cost transceivers and DSP, how is migration to 400G networks going to be a viable option?

PacketLight's next-generation standardised solutions may be the answer. Click below to read the full article.

CLICK HERE!

WEBINAR PROMOTION ON ITWIRE: It's all about webinars

These days our customers Advertising & Marketing campaigns are mainly focussed on webinars.

If you wish to promote a Webinar we recommend at least a 2 week campaign prior to your event.

The iTWire campaign will include extensive adverts on our News Site itwire.com and prominent Newsletter promotion https://www.itwire.com/itwire-update.html and Promotional News & Editorial.

This coupled with the new capabilities 5G brings opens up huge opportunities for both network operators and enterprise organisations.

We have a Webinar Business Booster Pack and other supportive programs.

We look forward to discussing your campaign goals with you.

MORE INFO HERE!

BACK TO HOME PAGE
Alex Zaharov-Reutt

One of Australia’s best-known technology journalists and consumer tech experts, Alex has appeared in his capacity as technology expert on all of Australia’s free-to-air and pay TV networks on all the major news and current affairs programs, on commercial and public radio, and technology, lifestyle and reality TV shows. Visit Alex at Twitter here.

Share News tips for the iTWire Journalists? Your tip will be anonymous

WEBINARS ONLINE & ON-DEMAND

GUEST ARTICLES

VENDOR NEWS

Guest Opinion

Guest Interviews

Guest Reviews

Guest Research

Guest Research & Case Studies

Channel News

Comments