Tuesday, 25 August 2015 14:07

Drones track radio-tagged wildlife

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Drones track radio-tagged wildlife Photo Stuart Hay, ANU

Researchers at the Australian National University (ANU) and the University of Sydney are claiming a world first with the development of a radio-tracking drone to locate radio-tagged wildlife.

Lead researcher Dr Debbie Saunders from the ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society said the drones have successfully detected tiny radio transmitters weighing as little as one gram.

The system has been tested by tracking bettongs at the Mulligan’s Flat woodland sanctuary in Canberra.

“The small aerial robot will allow researchers to more rapidly and accurately find tagged wildlife, gain insights into movements of some of the world’s smallest and least known species, and access areas that are otherwise inaccessible,” Dr Saunders said.

“We have done more than 150 test flights and have demonstrated how the drones can find and map the locations of animals with radio tags.”

Researcher Oliver Cliff, from the Australian Centre for Field Robotics (ACFR) at the University of Sydney, said the technology had generated international interest. “Lots of people are trying to do this. It is not an easy process, but we believe we’ve come up with a solution.”

“We’ve had interest in our system from all around the world. We are still doing some fine tuning but we’ve achieved more than has ever been done before, which is exciting.”

Dr Saunders, a wildlife ecologist, came up with the idea eight years ago to track small dynamic migratory birds such as the endangered swift parrot.

The new system, funded by an ARC Linkage Project Grant and Loro Parque Foundacion, has been built and tested over the past two and a half years with Dr Robert Fitch and his team at the ACFR at the University of Sydney.

The robot consists of an off-the-shelf drone or unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), and the custom-built miniature receiver and antenna provides real-time information on radio-tracked wildlife, which are mapped live on a laptop.

ANU Associate Professor Adrian Manning, also from the Fenner School of Environment and Society, has helped the team by attaching VHF and GPS collars on bettongs at Mulligan’s Flat.

Professor Manning says radio tracking of collars manually is very time consuming.

“Early indications are that the drones could save a huge amount of time. If you have two operators working and they can put the drone up in two bursts of 20 minutes, they can do what would take half a day or more to do using ground methods.”

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Peter Dinham

Peter Dinham is a co-founder of iTWire and a 35-year veteran journalist and corporate communications consultant. He has worked as a journalist in all forms of media – newspapers/magazines, radio, television, press agency and now, online – including with the Canberra Times, The Examiner (Tasmania), the ABC and AAP-Reuters. As a freelance journalist he also had articles published in Australian and overseas magazines. He worked in the corporate communications/public relations sector, in-house with an airline, and as a senior executive in Australia of the world’s largest communications consultancy, Burson-Marsteller. He also ran his own communications consultancy and was a co-founder in Australia of the global photographic agency, the Image Bank (now Getty Images).

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