Home Enterprise Solutions ExtraHop brings real-time threat detection to Australia

Real-time analytics vendor ExtraHop has announced its machine-learning service, Addy, is now available in Australia.

Addy delivers real visibility for performance and security threats and is claimed to be the industry's first SaaS offering to observe and analyse all digital interactions.

It applies machine learning to wire data to detect anomalies as they happen, helping IT departments take a data-driven approach to security.

This has great potential for managing and significantly reducing security risks and breaches in real-time. ExtraHop claims Addy can help IT departments spot and resolve hundreds of anomalies as they happen.

Addy spent nine months in beta and is currently in production in the US, and this week became generally available in Australiao.

ExtraHop claims Addy has helped IT organisations spot and resolve hundreds of performance- and security-impacting anomalies, from reverse DNS lookups to the recent WannaCry ransomware outbreak. As a result, Addy customers report increased uptime, threat detection, mitigated breaches, and improved performance, as well as greater cohesion and collaboration across teams.

When combined with the ExtraHop analytics-first workflow recently introduced in ExtraHop version 6.2 corporate IT teams are instantly alerted to performance and security issues, and can easily and rapidly investigate. It becomes a mere matter of clicks to drill-down from high-level performance metrics to individual transactions to packets.

Addy's availability is said to accelerate ExtraHop's momentum in Australia, strengthening channel and alliance relationships.

“The real-time network analytics ExtraHop provides already helps Australian companies better understand their environment and detect threats,” said Bryce Hein, senior vice-president for ExtraHop. “With Addy, we’re bringing machine learning to bear, helping surface performance and security anomalies faster than ever, and cutting through the noise to keep IT and security teams focused on the most important issues. Not only will this help them stay secure and compliant, but it will also help ensure a better digital experience for customers.”

According to the Accenture High-Performance Security Report 2016, only 65% of effective breaches are discovered by internal security teams. In Australia, over half the respondents questioned for the report admitted it took "months" to detect successful breaches. Through constant synchronisation with existing internal systems, ExtraHop Addy gives businesses the power to analyse their networks closely in real time.

ExtraHop offers an interactive online demo to let people see the power Addy for themselves.

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David M Williams

David has been computing since 1984 where he instantly gravitated to the family Commodore 64. He completed a Bachelor of Computer Science degree from 1990 to 1992, commencing full-time employment as a systems analyst at the end of that year. David subsequently worked as a UNIX Systems Manager, Asia-Pacific technical specialist for an international software company, Business Analyst, IT Manager, and other roles. David has been the Chief Information Officer for national public companies since 2007, delivering IT knowledge and business acumen, seeking to transform the industries within which he works. David is also involved in the user group community, the Australian Computer Society technical advisory boards, and education.

 

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