×

Warning

JUser: :_load: Unable to load user with ID: 1543
Sunday, 16 May 2010 00:09

Laser: 50 years old, still tech focused

By

The word laser was originally the acronym LASER, which stood for "light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation." Now, fifty years since its invention, we look back to its origin and its future.

 


The laser is a mechanism for emitting electromagnetic radiation (light) through a process of stimulated emission.

The laser mechanism often uses visible light, which is a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum made up of the radiation groups called radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, x-rays, and gamma rays.

The electromagnetic radiation is emitted as a narrow, spatially coherent (of the same frequency, phase, and polarization), low-divergence beam, which is called laser light.

The first laser was created on May 16, 1960, just about fifty years ago, by U.S. physicist Theodore Harold 'Ted' Maiman (1927'”2007), who was working at the Hughes Research Laboratories.

Others before him laid out the theory of lasers, including Albert Einstein in 1917 when he described the theoretic foundation for the laser in his paper Zur Quantentheorie der Strahlung (On the Quantum Theory of Radiation).

Now that the laser is fifty years old, Scientific American has come out with a paper that describes the events that led up to its invention.

Page two continues.

 

 



Please read the May 14, 2010 Scientific American article 'Key Moments in the Laser's First Half Century.'

The article begins: 'On August 6, 1960, Hughes Research Laboratories scientist Theodore Maiman published a study in Nature (pdf) describing his experiments with "stimulated optical radiation in ruby." (Scientific American is part of Nature Publishing Group.) With this research, he took the laser'”originally "Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation"'”out of the realm of science fiction and created a tool that would change the world in ways few people could have conceived of at the time.'

Learn more about lasers at the American Institute of Physics (AIP) article 'Bright idea: The First Lasers.'

This article begins: 'Since ancient times, people believed that rays of light carry grand and mysterious powers. Interest in radiation redoubled around the start of the 20th century with the discovery of radio, X-rays and radioactivity. A whole spectrum of radiation opened up, with wavelengths longer or shorter than light (see sidebar). What amazing new uses might be discovered for use in medicine, communications, scientific research '” or warfare?'

 

We might not think too much about lasers in our daily lives, but our daily lives are filled with applications that owe their existence to lasers. When you go to the supermarket or any retail store your items are scanned with a barcode scanner that uses a laser. When you play your CDs or DVDs you use a laserdisc player.

Page three concludes.

 



In addition, eye surgeries are performed by surgeons using lasers, along with surgeries involving the removal of kidney stones. Dentists use lasers when treating teeth.

In manufacturing, welding, cutting, and other processes use lasers to make products, and to measure and analyze their safety and reliability.

We defend our country with missiles that use lasers to guide them, and we use instruments that use lasers to spy on our enemies and to find out where we are with respect to an enemy target.

Our police and law enforcement agencies use lasers to make sure we identify criminals through fingerprint detection techniques and to assure we can solve crimes involving forensic identification.

Other uses for lasers are found at "How Lasers Work."

The laser is an amazing invention that makes our world a lot more simple, easy, and fun. And, it makes a world that is much safer, too.

As a note: U.S. physicist Gordon Gould (1920'”2005) is also sometimes given credit for the invention of the laser in 1957 (three years before Dr. Maiman). Unfortunately, he did not file a patent for his invention, while Maiman did. He ended up trying to convince the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office that he had the patient rights for the laser and other related technologies. He is generally claimed to be the first person to use the acronym LASER.

For more information on Dr. Gould, please read the article 'Gordon Gould - History of the Laser.'

 

 


BACK TO HOME PAGE

NEW OFFER - ITWIRE LAUNCHES PROMOTIONAL NEWS & CONTENT

Recently iTWire remodelled and relaunched how we approach "Sponsored Content" and this is now referred to as "Promotional News and Content”.

This repositioning of our promotional stories has come about due to customer focus groups and their feedback from PR firms, bloggers and advertising firms.

Your Promotional story will be prominently displayed on the Home Page.

We will also provide you with a second post that will be displayed on every page on the right hand side for at least 6 weeks and also it will appear for 4 weeks in the newsletter every day that goes to 75,000 readers twice daily.

POST YOUR NEWS ON ITWIRE NOW!

INVITE DENODO EXECUTIVE VIRTUAL ROUNDTABLE 9/7/20 1:30 PM AEST

CLOUD ADOPTION AND CHALLENGES

Denodo, the leader in data virtualisation, has announced a debate-style three-part Experts Roundtable Series, with the first event to be hosted in the APAC region.

The round table will feature high-level executives and thought leaders from some of the region’s most influential organisations.

They will debate the latest trends in cloud adoption and technologies altering the data management industry.

The debate will centre on the recently-published Denodo 2020 Global Cloud Survey.

To discover more and register for the event, please click the button below.

REGISTER HERE!

BACK TO HOME PAGE

BACK TO HOME PAGE

Webinars & Events

VENDOR NEWS

REVIEWS

Comments