Home Education Altair collaborates with RMIT in simulation-driven design
Altair collaborates with RMIT in simulation-driven design Stuart Miles FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Global engineering software company Altair is collaborating with RMIT University to provide unlimited access to high-tech simulation software used by Boeing, Telstra and GM Holden to reduce the weight of aeroplane and automotive structures.

The collaboration will ultimately also provide access high-tech simulation software to make Japan’s high-speed bullet trains safer, develop ultra-light bikes and drones, create wireless sensors that detect damage to planes from lighting strikes and for simulating bio-electromagnetic effects.

Under the agreement, RMIT students and staff will get unlimited access to simulation software used by engineers across the world under a first-of-its-kind agreement in Australia with Altair.

Students and staff in the College of Science, Engineering and Health can now access this high-end engineering simulation design software, and students are currently using the simulation software as part of RMIT Combustion and Electric Racing, which competes in the Formula SAE competition, and the RMIT unmanned aircraft systems research team.

{loadpositionpeter}It’s the first time the American-based Altair has worked with an Australian University to enable access to its engineering software programs for teaching and non-commercial research use and is promoted as another example of RMIT’s commitment to delivering industry-ready graduates.

The agreement is the brainchild of Joel Kennedy, an RMIT alumnus and project engineer at Altair, who said RMIT previously had access to the software, but it was quite limited.

“I used some of the design software during my studies but wasn’t taught HyperWorks. Now working with it, I can see the level of impact it has in industry and it will only continue to grow,” Kennedy said.

“This campus-wide agreement means students across science, engineering and health courses can access world-class engineering tools.

“We hope this agreement enables more collaboration between the disciplines as well as forging a strong industry connection between RMIT and Altair.”

Associate Dean of Aerospace Engineering and Aviation Professor Pier Marzocca welcomed the partnership.

“From few users to many, it is fantastic to see our students learning world-class computational engineering tools that can help in their academic and real-world engineering practices,” he said.

“It’s another example of RMIT embedding industry into everything we do and our commitment to providing students the best tools available to get them industry ready."

RMIT says that as global industry pushes for lean manufacturing techniques, faster prototyping and light weighting of optimised structures, additive manufacturing is now becoming a mainstream manufacturing technology globally and the design tools are a critical element of the process chain.

Advanced Manufacturing Precinct director Professor Milan Brandt said he was excited about how the software could link high-end product design capabilities with high-end manufacturing techniques.

“This software gives us access to the design tools and enable the ability to incorporate new manufacturing methods into prototyping and serial production,” he said.

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Peter Dinham

Peter Dinham is a co-founder of iTWire and a 35-year veteran journalist and corporate communications consultant. He has worked as a journalist in all forms of media – newspapers/magazines, radio, television, press agency and now, online – including with the Canberra Times, The Examiner (Tasmania), the ABC and AAP-Reuters. As a freelance journalist he also had articles published in Australian and overseas magazines. He worked in the corporate communications/public relations sector, in-house with an airline, and as a senior executive in Australia of the world’s largest communications consultancy, Burson-Marsteller. He also ran his own communications consultancy and was a co-founder in Australia of the global photographic agency, the Image Bank (now Getty Images).

 

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