Home Deals Axon secures Victoria Police body camera deal

Axon secures Victoria Police body camera deal

Axon secures Victoria Police body camera deal Featured

Connected law enforcement technologies company Axon Public Safety has locked up a deal with Victoria Police to purchase 11,000 of its Body 2 cameras.

Under the deal, Victoria Police secured a five-year subscription to the Axon cloud solution, Evidence.com, to help store, manage and share data from the body cameras and other digital evidence sources.

Axon Australia — a subsidiary of global group Axon Enterprise — announced today that the order was received in the first quarter of 2018 and would begin shipping in the second quarter.

Axon says Victoria Police will begin a staggered roll-out of the body cameras in April 2018 with the goal of outfitting all front-line police officers with cameras by 2020.

The rollout will commence with an initial pilot at two police stations as part of Victoria Police’s response to the Family Violence Royal Commission.

According to Axon, the goal is to capture victim and perpetrator statements of family violence-related crimes more immediately by the first officers responding to the scene, and it says the immediacy of these testimonies could help improve the overall judicial process by reducing the time victims need to spend in court.

“We are thrilled to see Victoria Police transform their agency with the adoption of body-worn camera technology,” says Axon chief executive and founder, Rick Smith. “We are proud that our investments in our rich hardware and software ecosystem allow us to be able to fulfil large-scale deployments such as this.”

Victoria Police is the latest police force in Australia to join the Axon network, following Queensland Police Service and Northern Territory Police.

According to Axon, QPS recently conducted a case study on the effects of body-worn cameras on domestic and family violence cases and results showed a 22% projected increase in DFV reporting when first officers responding to the scene were wearing body cameras.

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Peter Dinham

Peter Dinham is a co-founder of iTWire and a 35-year veteran journalist and corporate communications consultant. He has worked as a journalist in all forms of media – newspapers/magazines, radio, television, press agency and now, online – including with the Canberra Times, The Examiner (Tasmania), the ABC and AAP-Reuters. As a freelance journalist he also had articles published in Australian and overseas magazines. He worked in the corporate communications/public relations sector, in-house with an airline, and as a senior executive in Australia of the world’s largest communications consultancy, Burson-Marsteller. He also ran his own communications consultancy and was a co-founder in Australia of the global photographic agency, the Image Bank (now Getty Images).

 

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