Home Data SmartFreight adopts Global Data Standards for freight

Australian global freight software provider SmartFreight has adopted the recommendations in Austroads' supply chain visibility report for Australian industry to adopt Global Data Standards to improve freight visibility and supply chain efficiencies.

SmartFreight says it has now successfully completed GS1 Australia’s Transport Software Certification process and users are now able to generate freight labels according to the GS1 global supply chain standards outlined in the Australian Freight Labelling Guideline.

GS1 supply chain standards enable parties across the supply chain to operate more efficiently with improved freight visibility, using a common standard for identifying, labelling and sharing data relating to the movement of freight units. The Serial Shipping Container Code can be used to uniquely identify any type of logistic unit including satchels, cartons, crates and pallets.

The GS1 SSCC is a globally unique freight unit identifier used to uniquely identify each freight unit from origin to destination.

Kerry Holmes, managing director, Australia and New Zealand at SmartFreight said, “SmartFreight fully supports the Australian Freight Labelling Standards, based on GS1 Open Global Standards. The GS1 system is the most widely used supply chain standards system in the world, enabling increased visibility and reduced costs across the supply chain, which ultimately helps all Australians.”

GS1 Australia’s Senior Adviser – Trade, Transport and Heavy Industry, Michiel Ruighaver, said GSI was very pleased that SmartFreight have embraced GS1 global supply chain standards and “look forward to assisting them and their clients to improve efficiency and freight visibility within their supply chains”.

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Peter Dinham

Peter Dinham is a co-founder of iTWire and a 35-year veteran journalist and corporate communications consultant. He has worked as a journalist in all forms of media – newspapers/magazines, radio, television, press agency and now, online – including with the Canberra Times, The Examiner (Tasmania), the ABC and AAP-Reuters. As a freelance journalist he also had articles published in Australian and overseas magazines. He worked in the corporate communications/public relations sector, in-house with an airline, and as a senior executive in Australia of the world’s largest communications consultancy, Burson-Marsteller. He also ran his own communications consultancy and was a co-founder in Australia of the global photographic agency, the Image Bank (now Getty Images).

 

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