Home Business IT Security Mobility Twitter is serious about security

Twitter is ramping up its security even further, today launching an iOS and Android app update with 'login verification'.

The optional feature means users who turn it on will need their phone on them when using Twitter on desktop. It can be turned on inside the Security tab in the application's Settings.

Once activated, the iOS and Android application is the only way to approve Twitter.com sign-in requests, meaning if you lose your phone you'll need a backup code generated by the application.

The new feature comes just months after the social media giant introduced SMS-based login verification, and follows an 'anti-abuse' button introducted last week.

Users opting to utilise these security measures will need a confirmed email address and phone number for activation.

As part of the new feature announced today users will also be notified in real-time their account is being hacked.

"When a login request is made, you will see browser details and approximate location in the app. If you receive an approval request from halfway across the world, you may be getting phished," Twitter said.

According to the announcement on Twitter’s blog, the new login verification includes the following features:

  • No phone number required: By using push messaging and in-application approvals, users no longer need to provide a phone number to use login verification. If a user manages multiple Twitter accounts, but only has one phone number, they can opt all of the accounts into the login verification.
  • Broader international support: While login verification via SMS has been available through supported mobile carriers worldwide, it still didn’t cover everybody. Now, all that is needed for the new login verification enrollment is an Internet connection and one of Twitter’s supported apps.
  • Backup code generation: Backup codes generated in the application can be recorded and stored in a safe place to access an account on Twitter.com if a user’s phone is missing.
  • More context: Users will see browser details and approximate location in the app when a login request is made. If a request is coming from halfway around the world, the added context can help determine if an account is getting phished.

For more information on the new security measure check out Twitter's blog announcement here.

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David Swan

David Swan is a tech journalist from Melbourne and is iTWire's Associate Editor. Having started off as a games reviewer at the age of 14, he now has a degree in Journalism from RMIT (with Honours) and owns basically every gadget under the sun.

 

 

 

 

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