Home Business IT Security Enterprise encryption key management with SafeNet's KeySecure

Enterprise encryption key management with SafeNet's KeySecure

SafeNet claims its KeySecure enterprise key management platform is the first hardware product to comply with the KMIP standard.

SafeNet has implemented the OASIS Key Management Interoperability Protocol (KMIP 1.0) in its KeySecure enterprise key management product. This allows KeySecure to manage encryption keys for a variety of subsystems, including databases, applications, storage devices, network devices, and virtual instances.

SafeNet supports a variety of proprietary protocols in addition to KMIP. Centralisation makes key management easier, and simplifies the task of ensuring that policies are correctly applied. It also makes it possible to monitor all key-related activity.

Company officials claimed SafeNet was a driving force behind the adoption of industry standards for key management.

“"Key management is the foundation of encryption services, and is rapidly becoming a critical requirement for protecting and managing sensitive data across the enterprise,"” said Vince Lee, SafeNet's ANZ regional manager. "“We see customers increasingly leveraging key management as the engine behind central cryptographic operations to improve data protection and reduce cost, complexity, and sprawl."

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Stephen Withers

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Stephen Withers is one of Australia¹s most experienced IT journalists, having begun his career in the days of 8-bit 'microcomputers'. He covers the gamut from gadgets to enterprise systems. In previous lives he has been an academic, a systems programmer, an IT support manager, and an online services manager. Stephen holds an honours degree in Management Sciences and a PhD in Industrial and Business Studies.