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Sydney, Perth bid to host LCA 2014

After being in a position where it had no host for the 2014 Australian national Linux conference, better known as LCA, Linux Australia now finds that it has to decide between two bids.

A group from Sydney has put in a bid to host the conference in 2014 and 2015; there has been some talk on the Linux Australia mailing lists that it would be more cost-effective to use all the arrangements made for one year at least once more and the Sydney bid appears to be inspired by this logic.

The second bid for 2014 has come from a group in Perth, the first city to ensure the presence of Linux creator Linus Torvalds at the conference back in 2003.

Linux Australia normally announces the host for a given year at the previous year's conference; that means it would have to decide between Perth and Sydney and make an announcement during the 2013 event in Canberra early next year.

The conference is the main annual event for Linux Australia, the umbrella group for Linux user groups in the country. The LCA also serves as to provide funds for all the activities that Linux Australia undertakes, including hosting a number of smaller conferences.

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Sam Varghese

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A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.