Home Business IT Open Source New version of SUSE Manager released

New version of SUSE Manager released

The systems management software SUSE Manager is one application that has enabled the Linux company to achieve what it believes is a competitive gain over other commercial distributions.

Hence, it was but fitting that an upgrade to this package should be announced during the first SUSECON, the company's first annual conference as a standalone business unit after it was taken private last year.

SUSE Manager 1.7 was announced yesterday at the conference in Orlando, Florida; it enables the management of servers running either SUSE Linux Enterprise Server or Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

There are compliance improvements in the new release, such as OpenSCAP which offers a standardised approach to maintaining the security of business systems through patching, including a way of checking to see if security has been breached.

The new release supports the PostgreSQL database, in addition to Oracle 10g or 11g. It also supports the use of IPv6.

In part, SUSE Manager owes its existence to the open source Spacewalk project which Red Hat released to the public; Red Hat's own NetWork Satellite product is derived from the same codebase.

The writer is attending SUSECON as a guest of SUSE

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Sam Varghese

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A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.