Home Business IT Open Source LCA 2013 invites proposals for talks

LCA 2013 invites proposals for talks

The organisers of the 2013 Australian national Linux conference have invited prospective speakers to submit proposals for talks.

While the event's focus will be on technical content, the conference, to be held at the Australian National University in Canberra from January 28 to February 2 next year, is also open to talks on other subjects such as freedom and privacy, open source cloud systems, or energy efficient server farms of the future, just to cite a few.

A large number of possible topics are listed on the conference website.

Proposals can be submitted until July 6. Successful presenters will be notified beginning August 28; they will be afforded free entry to the conference as professional delegates.

The conference expects to cater to about 650 delegates in total and early registrations will open on October 1.

In 2013, the conference will revert to the usual format of having two days of mini-conferences and three days devoted to the main event. In 2012, the conference departed from this format and had a single day of mini-conferences; the remainder of the week was devoted to the main event, with talks which were voted as the best of those presented on the first three days being repeated on the final day.

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Sam Varghese

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A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.