Home Business IT Open Source First open tablet released by KDE developer

First open tablet released by KDE developer

The first open tablet, running free and open source software, has been announced by senior KDE developer Aaron Seigo.


In a post on his blog, Seigo said the device was called the Spark. It has a 1GHz AMLogic ARM processor, Mali-400 GPU, 512 MB RAM, 4GB internal storage plus an SD card slot, a 7" capacitive multi-touch screen and WiFi connectivity.

The user interface will be Plasma Active which has been developed by the KDE project, one of the two main desktop interfaces for Linux.

Seigo said the device "sports an open Linux stack on unlocked hardware and comes with an open content and services market. The user experience is, of course, Plasma Active and it will be available to the general public."

The device will be sold at retail for €200.

Seigo said he would have more details later in the week about how people could order their devices, and software and hardware which made up the Spark.

Judging from the picture posted by Seigo, the device has an earphone jack, power slot, 2 mini USB slots, a mini HDMI slot, and a micro SD card slot.

Spark tablet

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Sam Varghese

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A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.