Tuesday, 18 December 2018 06:01

PSMA releases Buildings API to provide data for every address

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PSMA releases Buildings API to provide data for every address Pixabay

Location data provider PSMA Australia has rolled out a Buildings API which is claimed to allow software developers to have authoritative location intelligence to Web-enabled business processes and applications.

A statement from the company, which is owned by Australia's federal, state and territory governments, said the release of the Building API came in the wake of its releasing a national Geoscape dataset that mapped every building in the country in detail.

The API will allow developers to build applications that can access building information on demand. Users "call" the API using either an address or geocode and the API will return buildings data for the particular address or location.

“The way location data is used has changed significantly in the last decade,"said Dan Paull, chief executive, PSMA Australia.

"In today’s connected society, businesses rely on location data for a huge range of tasks, from powering digital maps to matching correct delivery addresses; for property development and planning to assessing risk.

"Using the API, software developers can access comprehensive buildings data with ease and only pay for what they access."

buildings map

2.5D building footprints along a rail corridor. Courtesy PSMA

The statement said the Buildings API was used along with PSMA’s Addresses API to make an address string query, match it to a known address, look up buildings at the address and obtain the characteristics of each building.

Building characteristics include 2D and 3D building footprints, area, height, elevation, roof material and complexity, solar panels and adjacent swimming pools.

“With a robust address string query engine, users can have complete confidence in finding the right address," said Paull.

"During beta testing, we saw huge demand for this type of data with over 800,000 calls made to the API. Incredibly, the total number of building attributes requested was nearly 2.5 million.

“This could revolutionise the operations of a range of businesses, large and small. For the first time, for example, a solar panel installer can accurately understand and map the buildings in their neighbourhood to see which already have solar panels, but the possibilities are virtually endless."

The API can be tested out or bought on a starter plan here.

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Sam Varghese

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Sam Varghese has been writing for iTWire since 2006, a year after the site came into existence. For nearly a decade thereafter, he wrote mostly about free and open source software, based on his own use of this genre of software. Since May 2016, he has been writing across many areas of technology. He has been a journalist for nearly 40 years in India (Indian Express and Deccan Herald), the UAE (Khaleej Times) and Australia (Daily Commercial News (now defunct) and The Age). His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.

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