The Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) has certified Samsung's Galaxy S9 and S9+ smartphones in Australia with "protected-level" status, this meeting the Australian Government’s stringent security standards.

Machine data aggregator and analytics software company Splunk has announced a $US150m fund to invest in data startups.

More than half of the Australians and New Zealanders who participated in a survey about artificial intelligence have indicated they trust a robot more than their manager, while half say they have sought advice from a mechanical being rather than their manager.

Windows ransomware has become a major problem for small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs), a survey by Datto, a company that provides IT solutions for managed service providers (MSPs), shows, with 91% of MSPs in Australia and New Zealand reporting attacks on SMBs in the last two years.

Rival telcos Telstra and Optus have both launched their mobile plan offerings for the new Google Pixel 4 smartphones, each with a raft of offers to tempt consumers buying the new phones.

The government has made the use of two-factor authentication compulsory when porting mobile numbers from one provider to another, in what it says is a big step to keep Australians safe from telephone scammers.

Private equity firm BGH Capital has pumped a sizeable amount into the formation of a cyber security firm CyberCX, which will unite 12 independent firms: Alcorn, Assurance, Asterisk, CQR, Diamond, Enosys, Klein & Co., Phriendly Phishing, Sense of Security, Shearwater, TSS, and YellIT.

ASX-listed Canberra-based cyber security firm archTIS has signed up the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission as the first intelligence agency to use its cloud-based platform, Kojensi Gov.

Retailer Target has admitted to the competition watchdog, the ACCC, that it may have breached Australian Consumer Law by making false or misleading representations in its dealings with customers who purchased faulty Sony PlayStations.

The Australian Cyber Security Centre tried to censor the content of a talk to be given by the partner of a Sydney legal firm at the CyberCon conference in Melbourne last week, but the organisers backed down at the last minute and the talk went ahead in its original format. The main objection apparently was to the lawyer's statement that Australia's encryption law was similar to laws in China.

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