Home Your IT Mobility Apple smashes Samsung, in court
Apple smashes Samsung, in court Featured

The biggest of Apple and Samsung's numerous legal tussles has potentially been resolved once and for all, with a jury ordering Samsung to pay Apple US$290 million.

The verdict relates to 13 older Samsung devices that a previous jury found were among 26 Samsung products that infringed Apple patents.

That jury had awarded Apple $1.05 billion, but US District Judge Lucy Koh threw out $450 million of the damages, concluding that jury miscalculated the amount Samsung owed, and ordered a retrial.

The retrial has meant Apple recouped most of what it wanted in compensation.

Various reports from journalists who attended the retrial said Samsung had argued that it should only have to pay US$52 million, while Apple said the damage done was closer to US$380 million.

The original jury determined Samsung did indeed infringe on Apple's patents, and the re-trial instead focussed on the extent of compensation and damages.

CNET reported Samsung would have paid Apple close to US$930 million over the patent dispute.

The verdict is in no way final however; Samsung has the option of appealing the retrial verdict, continuing the battle that first begun way back in April 2011.

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David Swan

David Swan is a tech journalist from Melbourne and is iTWire's Associate Editor. Having started off as a games reviewer at the age of 14, he now has a degree in Journalism from RMIT (with Honours) and owns basically every gadget under the sun.

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