Home Your IT Mobility Mint offers 'invisible' wireless charging for Samsung smartphones
Mint offers 'invisible' wireless charging for Samsung smartphones Featured

Mint Technology's Qi wireless charging adaptors for the Samsung Galaxy S3 and S4 fit right inside the case.

Qi wireless charging can be handy, but not everyone likes the idea of having to use a sleeve like those Energizer offers for the iPhone range.

A neater idea is to build the 'receiver' into the device's back plate (such as Samsung's accessory for its S4 mobile phone) or to fit it inside the case.

The latter approach has been chosen by Mint Technology, which offers a Qi charging pad plus an internal card for the Samsung S3 (available now) or S4 (available in July) for $79.95.

When purchased separately, the cards cost $29.95 and the pad costs $59.95.

A charging pad capable of handling two devices simultaneously costs $99.95.

Mint MD Kuni Ishii said "the exciting thing about this new inductive electrical power transfer technology is that being the new industry standard, Qi charging stations will soon be available everywhere, fitted within tables in cafes, restaurants and airports – all manner of public places, enabling Qi compliant devices to remain in charge wherever you go."

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Stephen Withers

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Stephen Withers is one of Australia¹s most experienced IT journalists, having begun his career in the days of 8-bit 'microcomputers'. He covers the gamut from gadgets to enterprise systems. In previous lives he has been an academic, a systems programmer, an IT support manager, and an online services manager. Stephen holds an honours degree in Management Sciences, a PhD in Industrial and Business Studies, and is a senior member of the Australian Computer Society.

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