Home Your IT Mobility Samsung picks up the Tab with new device
Samsung picks up the Tab with new device Featured

Samsung has unveiled the latest addition to line of iPad-killers, the Galaxy Tab 3.

It's the first new Tab device we've seen in just over a year, following a string of Notes, and appears to be aimed at a budget-conscious demographic who aren't prepared to shell out $400 for the Galaxy Note 8.

The Galaxy Tab 3 boasts a 7-inch 1,024-by-600 pixel display, and runs Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, much like its Note counterparts.

Samsung has said the Wi-Fi version will be available globally beginning in May and the 3G version, which can be used make phone calls, will follow in June.

Under the hood, the new Tab is powered by a 1.2-GHz dual-core processor and comes with a whopping 4,000 mAh battery, either 8GB or 16GB of storage, and 1GB of RAM.

The device comes in at 111.1 x 188.0 x 9.9mm, making it small enough to hold in one hand, Samsung said.

The Wi-Fi version weighs 302g while the 3G version is a tad heavier at 306g.

"With the new Galaxy Tab 3, Samsung has evolved its range of innovative tablets, making them smaller and easier to carry, while increasing the user experience overall," Samsung said in a statement.

It seems Samsung now has all bases covered with the Galaxy S4 smartphone, the Galaxy Note 8 tablet and now the Galaxy Tab 3.

While Apple's iPads are still dominating sales charts, Samsung is beginning to make inroads as users of its popular Galaxy smartphones look for a similar experience on their tablet.

We'll bring you a full review when the device is out next month.

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David Swan

David Swan is a tech journalist from Melbourne and is iTWire's Associate Editor. Having started off as a games reviewer at the age of 14, he now has a degree in Journalism from RMIT (with Honours) and owns basically every gadget under the sun.

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