Home Your IT Mobility Speedy microSDHC cards from Lexar for HD capture
Speedy microSDHC cards from Lexar for HD capture Featured

A new series of microSDHC UHS-I memory cards from Lexar provide transfer speeds up to 90MBps, allowing uninterrupted capture of HD and 3D video.

Lexar's new Class 10 UHS-I cards come in 16GB (approx $36) and 32GB (approx $75) versions.

A compact USB 3.0 (USB 2.0 compatible) card reader is included to allow data to be transferred to a computer as rapidly as possible.

"With each new high-definition camera introduced to the market there are enhanced capabilities added, enabling people to capture more of the action than previously possible, especially photos and videos captured on today's popular HD sportscams," said Adam Kaufman, product marketing manager, Lexar.

"Additionally, mobile phones have become an essential tool to help capture those unexpected moments people just don’t want to forget.

"The Lexar High-Performance microSDHC UHS-I card provides consumers with a complete solution to efficiently store and manage their important mobile content, no matter the mobile device used to capture it."

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Stephen Withers

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Stephen Withers is one of Australia¹s most experienced IT journalists, having begun his career in the days of 8-bit 'microcomputers'. He covers the gamut from gadgets to enterprise systems. In previous lives he has been an academic, a systems programmer, an IT support manager, and an online services manager. Stephen holds an honours degree in Management Sciences, a PhD in Industrial and Business Studies, and is a senior member of the Australian Computer Society.

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