Home Your IT Mobility TomTom updates navigation app for iPhone 5 screen

A new version of TomTom's iPhone app makes use of the larger screen on the iPhone 5. But the loss of Google Local is proving unpopular.

The TomTom Australia iPhone app now takes advantage of the iPhone 5's larger screen to display more of the map, more menu options and more search results.

Version 1.12 is fully tested with iOS 6, according to company officials, and can be used as the routing app to take you to a location selected in Apple's Maps app.

Sine the Google Local Search service has been discontinued, TomTom has replaced it with TomTom Places, a search facility designed to find nearby places and services such as petrol stations.

Initial user reviews focus on the loss of Google Local Search, but since that service has was officially deprecated by Google two years ago they can hardly blame TomTom. It would have been more informative if they had reported how well - or poorly! - TomTom Places functions.

The app comes with the latest TomTom map of Australia, and the purchase price includes a lifetime map subscription.

According to the company, the optional HD Traffic service ($41.99 per year as an in-app purchase) has been improved.

TomTom Australia costs $74.99.

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Stephen Withers

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Stephen Withers is one of Australia¹s most experienced IT journalists, having begun his career in the days of 8-bit 'microcomputers'. He covers the gamut from gadgets to enterprise systems. In previous lives he has been an academic, a systems programmer, an IT support manager, and an online services manager. Stephen holds an honours degree in Management Sciences, a PhD in Industrial and Business Studies, and is a senior member of the Australian Computer Society.

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