Home Your IT Mobility Android malware scolds and shames users

An Android Trojan dubbed Walkinwat sends an SMS to all contacts stored on the phone, and sends personal data to a remote server.


Symantec reports that a fake version of an Android application exposes users to ridicule from their friends, family and business contacts.

A program masquerading as Walk and Text has appeared on several file sharing sites. The real Walk and Text is a messaging program that superimposes its display on a camera view of the real world, with the idea of avoiding embarrassing collisions and other mishaps. The app sells for €1.09 ($A1.49).

The bogus program seems designed to cause rather than avoid embarrassment, as it sends an SMS to everyone in the phone's contact list, reading "Hey,just downlaoded a pirated App off the Internet, Walk and Text for Android. Im stupid and cheap, it costed only 1 buck.Don't steal like I did!"

At the same time, it sends the user's name, phone number and other information to a remote server.

It finally taunts the user with the message: "Application Not Licensed. We really hope you learned something from this. Check your phone bill;) Oh and dont forget to buy the App from the Market".

CONTINUED

FREE WHITEPAPER - RISKS OF MOVING DATABASES TO VMWARE

VMware changed the rules about the server resources required to keep a database responding

It's now more difficult for DBAs to see interaction between the database and server resources

This whitepaper highlights the key differences between performance management between physical and virtual servers, and maps out the five most common trouble spots when moving production databases to VMware

1. Innacurate metrics
2. Dynamic resource allocation
3. No control over Host Resources
4. Limited DBA visibility
5. Mutual ignorance

Don't move your database to VMware before learning about these potential risks, download this FREE Whitepaper now!

DOWNLOAD!

Stephen Withers

joomla visitors

Stephen Withers is one of Australia¹s most experienced IT journalists, having begun his career in the days of 8-bit 'microcomputers'. He covers the gamut from gadgets to enterprise systems. In previous lives he has been an academic, a systems programmer, an IT support manager, and an online services manager. Stephen holds an honours degree in Management Sciences, a PhD in Industrial and Business Studies, and is a senior member of the Australian Computer Society.

Connect