Home Your IT Home IT HBO kills 3D printed Game of Thrones iPhone cradle
Fernando Sosa's iPhone cradle never made it to production Fernando Sosa's iPhone cradle never made it to production nuPROTO.com Featured

An extremely detailed 3D printed Iron Throne iPhone dock is no more, after HBO filed a cease and desist letter against its maker.

Fernando Sosa, who used Autodesk Maya based on still images from Game of Thrones, began selling it beside other 3D printed sculptures on his site, nuPROTO.com.

The company behind the Game of Thrones TV show HBO found out, however, before the item was even ready to be printed.

“I guess it kind of snowballed in publicity,” Sosa told Wired. “I didn’t think it would get this big. And all of a sudden, we got a letter from HBO.”

The letter said in blunt terms that any 3D printing of Thrones-related items isn't on.

“While we appreciate the enthusiasm for the Series that appears to have inspired your creation of this device, we are also concerned that your iron throne dock will infringe on HBO’s copyright in the Iron Throne,” the letter reads.

HBO Vice President of Corporate Affairs Jeff Cusson said it was a “pretty straightforward intellectual property infringement.”

“Especially with a show like Game of Thrones, the amount of product licensed around that is exorbitant,” he told Wired, adding that he’s not sure of the specifics around another licensed throne dock.

Speculation is now rife that, as 3D printing takes off, trademark infringement will as well.

"It's going to be a problem for the future," said Sosa.

"A lot of new products are going to come out, and big companies are going to squash the little companies."

"We're at the tipping point," Darrell Mottley, a patent and trademark attorney at Banner & Witcoff, told Bloomberg. "The technology has got to where it's not that expensive. If you're a manufacturer and people start making their own replacement parts, what does that mean?"

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David Swan

David Swan is a tech journalist from Melbourne and is iTWire's Associate Editor. Having started off as a games reviewer at the age of 14, he now has a degree in Journalism from RMIT (with Honours) and owns basically every gadget under the sun.

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