Home Your IT Entertainment YouTube passes one billion per month
YouTube celebrity Keyboard Cat YouTube celebrity Keyboard Cat

Google's video sharing service YouTube announced it has over one billion people watching its videos every month. That’s a lot of cat videos.

The milestone was announced on Wednesday by the site, and means YouTube crossed the 1 billion threshold five months after Facebook if various reports are to be believed.

The vast audience has meant YouTube's owner, Google, has another massive lucrative channel for selling online ads on top of its traditional internet search engine.

Google bought YouTube for US$1.76 billion back in 2006, when the video site had an estimated 50 million users worldwide.

YouTube was originally created by three former PayPal employees in February 2005, and most of the content on YouTube has been uploaded by individuals, although media corporations including CBS, the BBC, Vevo, Hulu, and other organizations offer some of their material via the site, as part of the YouTube partnership program.

The most popular video of all-time on YouTube is of course Psy’s Gangnam Style, which has well over a billion views itself.

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David Swan

David Swan is a tech journalist from Melbourne and is iTWire's Associate Editor. Having started off as a games reviewer at the age of 14, he now has a degree in Journalism from RMIT (with Honours) and owns basically every gadget under the sun.

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