Home Your Tech Entertainment BenQ cuts cost of 3D HD projectors

BenQ has announced what it claims are the first 3D full HD short-throw video projector and the company's first sub-$1000 3D full HD projector.

Aimed at the home market, the $1899 W1080ST (pictured above) is said to be the first 3D, full HD short-throw video projector to be released anywhere in the world, and is due here by the end of the month.

Specifications include 2000 lumen brightness, a 10,000:1 contrast ratio, a built-in 10W speaker, and two HDMI connections.

"It's the world's first full HD short-throw home entertainment projector, creating a 65in image when positioned at a distance of just one metre, preventing image obstruction and shadows on the screen which is particularly important when engaging in motion sensing games," said Chee F Chung, general manager for BenQ Australia.

If you're on a tighter budget, the $999 W1070 has generally similar specifications except that it is not a short-throw model. Ms Chung said it is "unrivalled" at the price.

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Stephen Withers

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Stephen Withers is one of Australia¹s most experienced IT journalists, having begun his career in the days of 8-bit 'microcomputers'. He covers the gamut from gadgets to enterprise systems. In previous lives he has been an academic, a systems programmer, an IT support manager, and an online services manager. Stephen holds an honours degree in Management Sciences, a PhD in Industrial and Business Studies, and is a senior member of the Australian Computer Society.

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