Home Science Space Explore universe with green energy

The Australian government announced on June 9, 2010, that it will develop solar and geothermal energy technologies to run a radio-astronomy observatory and support equipment in Perth. The universe can be explored with green technologies.

 


The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), which is the Australian government's scientific research organization will be receiving A$47.3 million to develop solar and geothermal energy technologies to run the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO, the University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, an inner suburb of Perth).

The money will also be used for the Pawsey High-Performance Computing Centre for SKA Science (Pawsey Centre, Kensington, Western Australia, an inner suburb of Perth).

According to the EurekAlert article Natural energy to help power exploration of the universe, 'The Sustainable Energy for SKA facility will be funded through the Sustainability Round of the Government's Education Investment Fund (EIF).'

And, 'The funding will support renewable energy infrastructure projects for the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory and the Pawsey High-Performance Computing Centre for SKA Science in Perth.'

The EurekAlert article states, "CSIRO Chief Executive Dr. Megan Clark said the new project will accelerate the development of renewable energy technologies in Australia.'

Dr. Megan Clark states, "The Sustainable Energy for SKA project will fund solar and photovoltaic technology to help power the Murchison site and the nation's largest direct heat geothermal demonstrator to cool the Pawsey Centre supercomputer.'

Page two concludes with additional comments from Dr. Clark.

 

 

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William Atkins

William Atkins completed educational degrees in science (bachelor’s in physics and mathematics) from Illinois State University (Normal, United States) and business (master’s in entrepreneurship and bachelor’s in industrial relations) from Western Illinois University

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