Home Science Space Five ISS countries want space ops through 2028

The space agencies for the United States, Russia, Canada, Europe, and Japan are eager to use the International Space Station for expanded scientific experiments, possibly through the year 2028.


The leaders of these five space agencies met on March 11, 2010, in Tokyo, Japan, to discuss their future cooperation and participation on the orbiting science laboratory, the International Space Station.

The March 11, 2010 NASA media brief 'Heads of agency International Space Station joint statement,' states, 'With the assembly of the ISS nearing completion and the capability to support a full-time crew of six established, they [the heads of these five space agencies] noted the outstanding opportunities now offered by the ISS for on-orbit research and for discovery including the operation and management of the world's largest international space complex.'

The leaders also stated that, ''¦ the unprecedented opportunities that enhanced use of this unique facility provides to drive advanced science and technology. This research will deliver benefits to humanity on Earth while preparing the way for future exploration activities beyond low-Earth orbit.'

And, 'The ISS will also allow the partnership to experiment with more integrated international operations and research, paving the way for enhanced collaboration on future international missions.'

The five space agencies participating in these talks are the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for the United States, The Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) for Russia, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) for Canada, the European Space Agency (ESA) for the European Union, and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) for Japan.

Page two continues with the reason why the International Space Station can easily continue operations through 2028.

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William Atkins

William Atkins completed educational degrees in science (bachelor’s in physics and mathematics) from Illinois State University (Normal, United States) and business (master’s in entrepreneurship and bachelor’s in industrial relations) from Western Illinois University

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