Home Science Space NASA probe shoots 3D images of potato-shaped moon Phobos
The NASA spacecraft Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has taken stunning false-color, three-dimensional images of the small, irregularly shaped Mars’ moon Phobos using its HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) camera.


The heavily cratered Phobos, which is 13.7 miles (22-kilometer) in diameter, is thought by scientists to be an asteroid previously captured by the gravitational pull of the planet Mars.

It is the larger and closer of Mars’ two moons (with the other one named Deimos). As the closest moon to any planet, Phobos is only 5,823 miles (9,377 kilometers) from the surface of Mars.

The tiny moon of Mars was photographed twice by HiRISE on March 23, 2008, while the MRO spacecraft was only 4,290 miles (6,800 kilometers) and 3,600 miles (5,800 kilometers) from the surface of Phobos.

The images are in three-dimensions because the camera has the ability to take images at three different wavelengths of visible light and infrared light and is able to take images at slightly different angles. These images were then combined by NASA scientists.

In the two images, the large impact crater Stickney dominates the scenery. The crater is approximately 5.6 miles (9 kilometers) in diameter, which covers nearly 41% of the diameter of Phobos.

The two images show Stickney to be bluer in color than its surrounding surface. Scientists think that the blue color indicates that the material inside the crater is younger than the surrounding material; thus, something impacted Phobos to make the crater.

Nathan Bridges, a member of the HiRISE team, stated, "Based on analogy with material on our own Moon, the bluer colour could mean that the material is fresher, or hasn't been exposed to space as long as the rest of Phobos's surface has.” [New Scientist (subscription required): “'Doomed' Mars moon imaged in stunning detail”]

In addition, streaks of color are seen along the sides of Stickney (along with other craters), which indicates to scientists that material has slid down sometime in its past.

Scientists think that many of the pockmarks on the surface of Phobos came when meteorites hit Mars and were flung out and hit the moon.

The two Mars Phobos images appear on the April 8, 2008 press release of NASA.

What about future missions to Phobos? Please read on.

FREE REPORT - IT MONITORING TOOLS COMPARISON

Are you looking to find the most efficient IT Monitoring tool available?

IT Monitoring is an essential part of the operations of any organisation with a significant network architecture.

Multiple IT monitoring platforms are available on the market today, supporting the various needs of small, medium-sized, and large enterprises, as well as managed service providers (MSPs).

This new report studies and compares eight different IT monitoring products in terms of functionality, operations, and usability on the same server platform with 100 end devices.

Which product is easiest to deploy, has the best maintenance mode capabilities, the best mobile access and custom reporting, dynamic thresholds setting, and enhanced discovery capabilities?

Download your free report to find out.

DOWNLOAD!

William Atkins

William Atkins completed educational degrees in science (bachelor’s in physics and mathematics) from Illinois State University (Normal, United States) and business (master’s in entrepreneurship and bachelor’s in industrial relations) from Western Illinois University

Connect