Home Science Health Playtime makes for better behaved children


The groups were further sub-divided into five more levels based on frequency and duration of the recesses. The behavior of the children was assessed by ratings made by the teachers based on class behavior.

The researchers analyzed the data and found that children exposed to “none/minimal” recesses were 30% more likely than children with “some” recesses to be:

“black,”

“from families with lower incomes,”

from families with “lower levels of education,"

living “in large cities,”

“to be from the Northeast or South”, and

to be attending "public school.”

The researchers stated in the abstract to their paper, “Teacher's rating of classroom behavior scores were better for children with some recess than for those with none/minimal break.”

They added, “However, among children receiving daily recess, the teacher's rating of class behavior scores did not differ significantly according to the level of exposure.”

They concluded, “These results indicated that, among 8- to 9-year-old children, having  1 daily recess period of >15 minutes in length was associated with better teacher's rating of class behavior scores. This study suggests that schoolchildren in this age group should be provided with daily recess.”

Lead researcher of the study and U.S. pediatrician Romina M.Barros, who is also an assistant clinical professor of pediatrics at Albert Einstein School of Medicine, was paraphrased to have stated in the January 26, 2009 ScienceDaily.com article “Daily School Recess Improves Classroom Behavior” that “… a daily break of 15 minutes or more in the school day may play a role in improving learning, social development, and health in elementary school children.”

Page three concludes with comments from Dr. Barros, along with additional information about recess and children from external sources.

WEBINAR 26/27th May

Thinking of deploying Business Intelligence (BI)? So are your competitors.

And the most important, fundamental, tool for delivering your BI information to your users? Dashboards.

THIS IS ONE NOT TO MISS SO REGISTER NOW

DON'T MISS OUT - REGISTER NOW!

FREE WHITEPAPER - RISKS OF MOVING DATABASES TO VMWARE

VMware changed the rules about the server resources required to keep a database responding

It's now more difficult for DBAs to see interaction between the database and server resources

This whitepaper highlights the key differences between performance management between physical and virtual servers, and maps out the five most common trouble spots when moving production databases to VMware

1. Innacurate metrics
2. Dynamic resource allocation
3. No control over Host Resources
4. Limited DBA visibility
5. Mutual ignorance

Don't move your database to VMware before learning about these potential risks, download this FREE Whitepaper now!

DOWNLOAD!

William Atkins

William Atkins completed educational degrees in science (bachelor’s in physics and mathematics) from Illinois State University (Normal, United States) and business (master’s in entrepreneurship and bachelor’s in industrial relations) from Western Illinois University

Connect

 

 

 

 

Join the iTWire Community and be part of the latest news, invites to exclusive events, whitepapers and educational materials and oppertunities.
Why do I want to receive this daily update?
  • The latest features from iTWire
  • Free whitepaper downloads
  • Industry opportunities