Home Science Health Playtime makes for better behaved children


The groups were further sub-divided into five more levels based on frequency and duration of the recesses. The behavior of the children was assessed by ratings made by the teachers based on class behavior.

The researchers analyzed the data and found that children exposed to “none/minimal” recesses were 30% more likely than children with “some” recesses to be:

“black,”

“from families with lower incomes,”

from families with “lower levels of education,"

living “in large cities,”

“to be from the Northeast or South”, and

to be attending "public school.”

The researchers stated in the abstract to their paper, “Teacher's rating of classroom behavior scores were better for children with some recess than for those with none/minimal break.”

They added, “However, among children receiving daily recess, the teacher's rating of class behavior scores did not differ significantly according to the level of exposure.”

They concluded, “These results indicated that, among 8- to 9-year-old children, having  1 daily recess period of >15 minutes in length was associated with better teacher's rating of class behavior scores. This study suggests that schoolchildren in this age group should be provided with daily recess.”

Lead researcher of the study and U.S. pediatrician Romina M.Barros, who is also an assistant clinical professor of pediatrics at Albert Einstein School of Medicine, was paraphrased to have stated in the January 26, 2009 ScienceDaily.com article “Daily School Recess Improves Classroom Behavior” that “… a daily break of 15 minutes or more in the school day may play a role in improving learning, social development, and health in elementary school children.”

Page three concludes with comments from Dr. Barros, along with additional information about recess and children from external sources.

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William Atkins

William Atkins completed educational degrees in science (bachelor’s in physics and mathematics) from Illinois State University (Normal, United States) and business (master’s in entrepreneurship and bachelor’s in industrial relations) from Western Illinois University

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