Home Science Energy When is a cargo container not a cargo container? When it's a house!
With the global recession upon us, many unused shipping (cargo) containers are just sitting around on waterfront docks all over the world. Because of this surplus of empty containers, some industrious architects and builders are using them to build houses and other such “green” based projects.


Shipping containers, or intermodal transport units (ITUs) are ISO (International Organization for Standardization) steel boxes that are loaded with materials, sealed, and shipped on container ships, railroad cars, aircraft, and trucks all over the world.

The system is called intermodal freight transport cargo transport. However, with the slow-down in the world economy, many of these shipping containers are not being used, and not being returned to their country of origin.
 
There are five common lengths used for the containers around the world: 20-foot (6.1 meter), 40-foot (12.2 meter), 45-foot (13.7 meter), 48-foot (14.6 meter), and 53-foot (16.2 meter).

The United States often uses the 48-foot and the 53-foot ones.

Check out the WebUrbanist.com article “10 Clever Architectural Creations Using Cargo Containers: Shipping Container Homes and Offices.”

Many of these homes look very stylish and modern in design.

According to the WebUrbanist article, the first U.S. home built out of shipping containers was one built in 2006 in California by Manhattan Beach, California-based architect Peter DeMaria.

See his website for more ideas on Cargo Container Homes.

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William Atkins

William Atkins completed educational degrees in science (bachelor’s in physics and mathematics) from Illinois State University (Normal, United States) and business (master’s in entrepreneurship and bachelor’s in industrial relations) from Western Illinois University

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