Home Science Climate Cows like vegetarians, but not UK researchers

 

A 2010 United Kingdom study found that being a vegetarian actually does more damage to our environment than being a meat-eater. Chickens aren't crowing about this finding either!



A scientific study performed by researchers at Cranfield University found that may foods that are substituted for meat in a vegetarian diet do more actual damage to the environment than does the farming of animals for meat.

Cranfield University has three campuses: two in Bedfordshire (Cranfield and Silsoe) and one in Wiltshire (Shrivenham). The main campus is in Canfield, Bedfordshire.

The study, which was paid for by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), a wildlife conservation and endangered species group (based out of Washington, D.C.), found that meat substitutes, like chickpeas, lentils, and soy, used in vegetarian (meat-free) diets do more harm to the overall environment of Earth than does diets where people consume meat.

The researchers say that because these vegetarian staples are imported into the United Kingdom from overseas, they do more harm to the general environment of Earth than does cows and lamb and other animals raised for food within the United Kingdom.

The February 12, 2010 Telegraph.co.uk article 'Becoming vegetarian 'can harm the environment'' states that 'An increase in vegetarianism could result in the collapse of British farming.'

The study concluded, as stated by the Telegraph, 'A switch from beef and milk to highly refined livestock product analogues such as tofu could actually increase the quantity of arable land needed to supply the UK."

Page two continues with the specific reasons why these U.K. researchers made this conclusion.

FREE WHITEPAPER - RISKS OF MOVING DATABASES TO VMWARE

VMware changed the rules about the server resources required to keep a database responding

It's now more difficult for DBAs to see interaction between the database and server resources

This whitepaper highlights the key differences between performance management between physical and virtual servers, and maps out the five most common trouble spots when moving production databases to VMware

1. Innacurate metrics
2. Dynamic resource allocation
3. No control over Host Resources
4. Limited DBA visibility
5. Mutual ignorance

Don't move your database to VMware before learning about these potential risks, download this FREE Whitepaper now!

DOWNLOAD!

William Atkins

William Atkins completed educational degrees in science (bachelor’s in physics and mathematics) from Illinois State University (Normal, United States) and business (master’s in entrepreneurship and bachelor’s in industrial relations) from Western Illinois University

Connect