Home Science Biology Kaiser report: Kids are entertainment media superusers
The Kaiser Family Foundation announced its report “Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8- to 18-Year-Olds” has shown that children in the United States use entertainment media devices for 53 hours in an average week, and compress nearly 11 hours of multimedia use in a 7.5-hour period each day.


The national survey conducted by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) is based on responses from over two thousand U.S. students in grades three to twelve. The survey was taken from October 2008 to May 2009.

The Kaiser Family Foundation published its results in the report “Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8- to 18-Year-Olds.”

It is available at “Generation M2.”

According to its website, the KFF is: "A leader in health policy and communications, the Kaiser Family Foundation is a non-profit, private operating foundation focusing on the major health care issues facing the U.S., as well as the U.S. role in global health policy.  Unlike grant-making foundations, Kaiser develops and runs its own research and communications programs, sometimes in partnership with other non-profit research organizations or major media companies."

The January 20, 2010 press release (“Daily Media Use Among Children and Teens Up Ddramataically From Five Years Ago”) from the Kaiser report begins, “With technology allowing nearly 24-hour media access as children and teens go about their daily lives, the amount of time young people spend with entertainment media has risen dramatically, especially among minority youth, according to a study released today by the Kaiser Family Foundation.”

Among its conclusions are:

•    For eight to eighteen year old children in the United States, they spend “… an average of 7 hours and 38 minutes (7:38) to using entertainment media across a typical day (more than 53 hours a week).”

•    Media usage increased by an hour and seventeen minutes per day over the past five years, from "... 6:21 in 2004 to 7:38 today.”

Page two continues with additional conclusions from the Kaiser Family Foundation report.

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William Atkins

William Atkins completed educational degrees in science (bachelor’s in physics and mathematics) from Illinois State University (Normal, United States) and business (master’s in entrepreneurship and bachelor’s in industrial relations) from Western Illinois University

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