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I want to shout from the rooftops to proclaim a triumph of online journalism.  But I can't.  I want to show you all a prize-winning piece of video.  But I'm banned from doing so; the threat of an $11,000 fine hangs over me and this site.

The George Polk Awards in Journalism are (according to Wikipedia) "a series of American journalism awards presented annually by Long Island University in New York" which were established in memory of CBS correspondent George Polk, killed in 1947 covering the Greek civil war.

Every year, recipients are recognised in a number of categories ranging from Foreign, legal, Economics and Education Reporting, through Television, Radio and Internet Reporting to Photojournalism.

It is this last category to which I wish to draw attention.

Announcing the 2009 winners, The University states "A reporter who was held captive by the Taliban and an anonymous videographer who filmed the killing of a woman during a protest in Iran are among those honored in 13 categories."

The announcement continues, "The George Polk Award for Videography will recognize the efforts of the people responsible for recording the death of 26-year-old Neda Agha-Soltan at a June protest in Tehran, Iran, and uploading the video to the Internet. Ms. Agha-Soltan reportedly was shot by a pro-government militiaman.

"The video, which shows the woman collapsing to the ground and being attended to by several men as she lay dying on the street, became a rallying point for the reformist opposition in Iran after it was broadcast over the Internet. Seen by millions as it spread virally across the Web, the images quickly gained the attention of international media."

Immediately following this citation, the announcement page includes a link to the video.

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David Heath

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David Heath has over 25 years experience in the IT industry, specializing particularly in customer support, security and computer networking. Heath has worked previously as head of IT for The Television Shopping Network, as the network and desktop manager for Armstrong Jones (a major funds management organization) and has consulted into various Australian federal government agencies (including the Department of Immigration and the Australian Bureau of Criminal Intelligence). He has also served on various state, national and international committees for Novell Users International; he was also the organising chairman for the 1994 Novell Users' Conference in Brisbane. Heath is currently employed as an Instructional Designer, building technical training courses for industrial process control systems.

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