Home opinion-and-analysis The Linux Distillery Linux.com holiday membership drive

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The Linux Foundation has launched its holiday member drive. Sign up for benefits such as your own linux.com e-mail address and, for some, to be automatically entered into a draw to win a $75 gift card to the Linux.com store.

The Linux Foundation is the non-profit organisation dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux. Individual membership is available to any person who wishes to support the goals of the Foundation and the work of Linux Torvalds.

Members receive exclusive benefits such as a linux.com e-mail address, discounted pricing from Dell, HP and Lenovo, 35% discounts on O’Reilly books and e-books, among more.

The Linux Foundation alerted iTWire to its holiday drive promotion, stating any person who signs up for individual membership up to December 14th 2012 will be automatically entered to win of two $75 gift cards to the Linux.com store.

Unfortunately, the rules stipulate only legal United States residents over the age of 18 are eligible, and that current members who renew are excluded; this promotion is only available to new members.

These caveats are disappointing but ultimately moot; the reason to join is to directly support and promote the work of the Foundation which includes direct backing of Linus Torvalds himself. Individual membership is $USD 99 and student membership is $USD 25.

Whether you win the $75 gift card or not, the Linux.com store can hook you up with t-shirts, hats, mugs and accessories relating to your favourite free open source operating system.

 

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David M Williams

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David has been computing since 1984 where he instantly gravitated to the family Commodore 64. He completed a Bachelor of Computer Science degree from 1990 to 1992, commencing full-time employment as a systems analyst at the end of that year. Within two years, he returned to his alma mater, the University of Newcastle, as a UNIX systems manager. This was a crucial time for UNIX at the University with the advent of the World-Wide-Web and the decline of VMS. David moved on to a brief stint in consulting, before returning to the University as IT Manager in 1998. In 2001, he joined an international software company as Asia-Pacific troubleshooter, specialising in AIX, HP/UX, Solaris and database systems. Settling down in Newcastle, David then found niche roles delivering hard-core tech to the recruitment industry and presently is the Chief Information Officer for a national resources company where he particularly specialises in mergers and acquisitions and enterprise applications.

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