Home opinion-and-analysis The Linux Distillery Is the second coming of DNS Y2K all over again?

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What's the upshot? Fundamentally, if your DNS queries wend their way back to you through equipment that rejects the beefier response then you simply can't resolve host names. You will not be able to use any Internet service by name.

The good news is that the protocol isn't new. It's been talked about and written about for most of this decade. You can be certain the big players - Cisco, major ISPs, the like - all have this matter under control in equipment manufactured and installed or upgraded in recent years.

Further, DNSSEC has been rolling out progressively across the mass collection of root name servers for several months now with few, if any, ill effects.

Still, if you have any concerns be sure to test your company, your home, your network using tools like OARC's DNS reply size test server.

Let's knock this problem over before the rest of the world get startled this time.

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David M Williams

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David has been computing since 1984 where he instantly gravitated to the family Commodore 64. He completed a Bachelor of Computer Science degree from 1990 to 1992, commencing full-time employment as a systems analyst at the end of that year. Within two years, he returned to his alma mater, the University of Newcastle, as a UNIX systems manager. This was a crucial time for UNIX at the University with the advent of the World-Wide-Web and the decline of VMS. David moved on to a brief stint in consulting, before returning to the University as IT Manager in 1998. In 2001, he joined an international software company as Asia-Pacific troubleshooter, specialising in AIX, HP/UX, Solaris and database systems. Settling down in Newcastle, David then found niche roles delivering hard-core tech to the recruitment industry and presently is the Chief Information Officer for a national resources company where he particularly specialises in mergers and acquisitions and enterprise applications.

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