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More than a month and a half after Debian project leader Lucas Nussbaum asked the technical committee to decide on the default init system for the next release, Jessie, the question still continues to be debated.

As of this writing, the discussion runs to nearly 2000 posts. And there have been plenty of earlier discussions as well. There is no shortage of jaw on the issue.

But positions are slowly beginning to be taken.

Two members of the eight-strong technical committee have openly stated their positions and there are strong indications as to which option two others will support.

Ian Jackson, a former employee of Canonical, has come out in support of upstart, which that company incidentally uses for its well-known Ubuntu distribution, while Russ Allbery has indicated his backing for systemd, the Red Hat-developed init system.

Two others on the panel, Colin Watson and Steve Langasek, are highly unlikely to support anything other than upstart.

Both are employees of Canonical and, apart from company loyalties, it would be stupid for them to support anything else given that it would create a huge amount of additional work and also play into the hands of a competitor.

The remaining members of the panel are Debian's eminence grise Bdale Garbee, Don Armstrong, Andreas Barth, and newly appointed member Keith Packard. Barth's postings to the discussion indicate that he is in favour of systemd.

Armstrong's posts indicate that he does not like the complexity that systemd encompasses; the UNIX philosophy has always been that one program does one task, does it properly, and hands over the output to the next program to continue in the same vein.

As to Garbee and Packard, their views are not openly known. But I would not bet on Garbee backing systemd. Which means that upstart is likely to be selected by a vote of five to three or six to two.

The other options - apart from systemd and upstart - which are being considered are the existing Sys-V system, OpenRC or multiple init systems.

Supporting multiple init systems may sound nice, but it is not likely, given the amount of work that is involved. Debian has a port with the FreeBSD kernel and systemd will not work with this kernel.

The late king of Saudi Arabia, Fahd, is said to have taken two years to fire his cook, simply because he could not bring himself to offend the man. The Debian project is like Fahd in one respect - it also takes a great deal of time to settle on anything.

However it is unlikely to take as long as Fahd did because the next release will not wait that long. Going by the date of the last release, it is expected to come out by end of 2014.

Image courtesy Debian GNU/Linux project

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Sam Varghese

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A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.

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