Home opinion-and-analysis Open Sauce LCA 2011: Travelling far and wide to spread the Debian gospel

Author's Opinion

The views in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of iTWire.

Have your say and comment below.

It's a long way from the cold boulevards of Paris to the searing heat of Brisbane but Stefano Zacchiroli has spent the 20-odd hours needed to make the trip because he wants to tell people in the FOSS community about the vital role that the Debian GNU/Linux Project still has to play.


Zacchiroli, the current leader of the project, told iTWire that his trip, to attend the 12th Australian national Linux conference in Brisbane, had been borne out of a talk which he presented to the last DebConf, the annual summit of Debian developers, in which he outlined what was still special about Debian.

"My fellow developers liked what I presented and they suggested that I take the same message elsewhere," Zacchiroli (pic below) said. "It was almost deadline time for submitting proposals for talks to the LCA folk but I just about made it in time."

His talk, titled "Who the bloody hell cares about Debian?" is scheduled for the last day of the conference, January 28.

Zacchiroli, who was voted in as DPL in April last year, said that though things were working out quite well as regards the plans he had when he ran for office, he was as yet undecided whether to stand for election again.
Stefano Zacchiroli
"Thus far, I have been able to communicate well with the developers - they always know what I am doing," he said. "I decided to stop hacking when I became leader because I felt that I could not do justice to both functions. It has worked out well for me."

Zacchiroli said the climate on the mailing lists - Debian has a reputation for having the best flame-fests of any FOSS project - had become quite good these days.

"The key ingredient in the project now is that it is a do-ocracy," he said. "If a developer thinks something is wrong, he can get up and fix it. Of course, bug reports are important too."

Asked about Ubuntu and the threat which some perceive it as posing to Debian, Zacchiroli said the two distributions had different roles.

"Debian has complete independence in decision-making; our decisions are made solely on technical merit and are not tied to any financial direction," he said.

"Further, as we are a community distribution, we can be faithful to the principles of freedom to a much higher degree than a commercial project. We have a degree of autonomy which other distributions do not have."

 

FREE WHITEPAPER - REMOTE SUPPORT TRENDS FOR 2015

Does your remote support strategy keep you and your CEO awake at night?

Today’s remote support solutions offer much more than just remote control for PCs. Their functional footprint is expanding to include support for more devices and richer analytics for trend analysis and supervisor dashboards.

It is imperative that service executives acquaint themselves with the new features and capabilities being introduced by leading remote support platforms and find ways to leverage the capabilities beyond technical support.

Field services, education services, professional services, and managed services are all increasing adoption of these tools to boost productivity and avoid on-site visits.

Which product is easiest to deploy, has the best maintenance mode capabilities, the best mobile access and custom reporting, dynamic thresholds setting, and enhanced discovery capabilities?

To find out all you need to know about using remote support to improve your bottom line, download this FREE Whitepaper.

DOWNLOAD!

Sam Varghese

website statistics

A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.

Connect