Home opinion-and-analysis Open Sauce How Mono apologists drive developers away

Author's Opinion

The views in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of iTWire.

Have your say and comment below.

Subscribe now and get the news that matter to your industry.

* Your Email Address:
* First Name:
* Last Name:
Industry:
Job Function:
Australian State:
Country:
Email marketing by Interspire
weebly statistics


"I have an Asus EEE PC Surf with 2GB of Flash (the lower end model, even lower than the basic EEE PC 701) and I have been trying to fit into it an openSUSE 11.1 with GNOME," Figuiere told iTWire at the time.

"To that end, I removed as much as I deemed unnecessary; this included Mono which is not a small chunk at all, and Python-GNOME. Also I have been wanting to know how easy it was to port Gtk# code to C++/Gtkmm for my personal curiosity. So I chose an application I was using and thought would make sense to have on the netbook. It was Tomboy."

But would the Mono crowd accept this explanation?

Hardly a fortnight had gone by when they were out with their pitchforks. Responding to a post on the Ubuntu forums, Jo Shields, who packages Mono for Debian, had this to say: "Ignoring the legal issues that surround it, GNote is nowhere near as functional as Tomboy yet - it doesn't support WikiWords, has no documentation, no syncing to anywhere, and no integration with any other apps. Its RAM consumption IS better (9.8M versus 23.4M out of the box), as long as you don't mind the lack of functionality."

Legal issues? Tomboy was released under the LGPL (version 2.1 only) and Figuiere released Gnote under the GPLv3 - which he is entitled to do. The text of the LGPL version 2.1 clearly says: "You may opt to apply the terms of the ordinary GNU General Public License instead of this License to a given copy of the Library. To do this, you must alter all the notices that refer to this License, so that they refer to the ordinary GNU General Public License, version 2, instead of to this License. (If a newer version than version 2 of the ordinary GNU General Public License has appeared, then you can specify that version instead if you wish.) Do not make any other change in these notices."

Shields, it must be noted, uses any and all tactics to drive his arguments, even to the extent of using racist terms to describe people and then feigning innocence.

Here he is again, on April 14, in a thread which began with a user posting Figuiere's announcement of the release of Gnote: "Still missing most of Tomboy's features, and involving wholesale license & copyright violation But remember, kids - stealing code is fine as long as it's "one in the eye" for Free Software developers like the Tomboy authors!"

PROTECT YOURSELF AGAINST BANDWIDTH BANDITS!

Don't let traffic bottlenecks slow your network or business-critical apps to a grinding halt. With SolarWinds Bandwidth Analyzer Pack (BAP) you can gain unified network availability, performance, bandwidth, and traffic monitoring together in a single pane of glass.

With SolarWinds BAP, you'll be able to:

• Detect, diagnose, and resolve network performance issues

• Track response time, availability, and uptime of routers, switches, and other SNMP-enabled devices

• Monitor and analyze network bandwidth performance and traffic patterns.

• Identify bandwidth hogs and see which applications are using the most bandwidth

• Graphically display performance metrics in real time via dynamic interactive maps

Download FREE 30 Day Trial!

CLICK TO DOWNLOAD!

ITWIRE SERIES - IS YOUR BACKUP STRATEGY COSTING YOU CLIENTS?

Where are your clients backing up to right now?

Is your DR strategy as advanced as the rest of your service portfolio?

What areas of your business could be improved if you outsourced your backups to a trusted source?

Read the industry whitepaper and discover where to turn to for managed backup

FIND OUT MORE!

Sam Varghese

website statistics

A professional journalist with decades of experience, Sam for nine years used DOS and then Windows, which led him to start experimenting with GNU/Linux in 1998. Since then he has written widely about the use of both free and open source software, and the people behind the code. His personal blog is titled Irregular Expression.

Connect