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Survey shows mixed outcomes for IT graduates Featured

Despite the supposed 'skills shortage,' IT graduates fare only slightly better than average in terms of employment, and a surprisingly large proportion find themselves in jobs where their degree isn't important.

Graduate Careers Australia produces regular reports on graduate employment. One of its more recent efforts is a follow-up survey three years after graduation, and the most recent report - Beyond Graduation 2012 - has just been published.

With the assistance of 39 institutions, nearly 13,000 usable responses were received from 2008 graduates.

Of those available for full-time employment at the time of the survey, 92.2% were working full time. That was up from 79.3% when the same cohort was surveyed in 2009, shortly after they graduated.

IT graduates do slightly better than average, with 93.4% working full time.

And while female IT graduates started off behind their male peers (76.6% vs 82.7% in 2009), their relative position has improved and in 2012 they were slightly more likely to be in full-time employment (93.9% vs 93.2%).

But only 70.2% of IT graduates said their degree was either a formal requirement or important to their main paid job. The only broad area of study with a lower percentage was creative arts (64.3%).

IT graduates were also the least likely to be in a relevant job shortly after completing their course.

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Stephen Withers

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Stephen Withers is one of Australia¹s most experienced IT journalists, having begun his career in the days of 8-bit 'microcomputers'. He covers the gamut from gadgets to enterprise systems. In previous lives he has been an academic, a systems programmer, an IT support manager, and an online services manager. Stephen holds an honours degree in Management Sciences, a PhD in Industrial and Business Studies, and is a senior member of the Australian Computer Society.

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