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Apple gains approval for 'spaceship' HQ Featured

Apple's amazing new second campus, dubbed the 'spaceship', has been cleared for construction by Californian officials.

The Cupertino City Council unanimously approved the 2.8-million-square-foot building on Tuesday, clearing the way for construction to commence.

The Council must meet again on 15 November to hold a final vote on the project, but that will be a mere formality. Apple said it now plans to begin demolishing building on the site by the end of this year, with construction to commence next year.

Apple cofounder Steve Jobs first unveiled the mysterious project in 2011, and had put plans in place for the main structure to house 12,000 employees, more than five times the current number.

The structure would also be dominated by landscaping, greenery and walking paths, giving the headquarters are very green feel, aside from all the spaceship comparisons.

As part of the 2.8-million-square-foot building the plans feature a 120,000-square-foot underground auditorium, above and below ground parking, bike paths, reconfigured public streets and pedestrian walkways, among other features.

The project's budget has quickly soared to $5 billion however from a previous estimate of $3 billion, as architects argued over costs and materials.

Apple CEO Tim Cook broke the good news this morning with a tweet: "Our home for innovation and creativity for decades to come. Cupertino City Council Gives Unanimous Approval for Apple's New Campus."

Cook said February that Apple is aiming to complete construction of the project and move in by 2016.

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David Swan

David Swan is a tech journalist from Melbourne and is iTWire's Associate Editor. Having started off as a games reviewer at the age of 14, he now has a degree in Journalism from RMIT (with Honours) and owns basically every gadget under the sun.

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