Home Industry Strategy Hulu and Vdio to hit Australia?
Hulu and Vdio to hit Australia? Featured

After long threatening to hit Australian shores, two popular overseas video streaming services might be finally making the leap down under.

While Foxtel Go and Quickflix have owned the Australian streaming market for years now, US-based efforts like Hulu and Netflix have long been the envy of Aussie viewers, boasting superior content and more features and devices than local offerings.

That might all be changing, however, with Hulu and smaller rival Vdio filing for local trade marks in Australia.

The news first came courtesy of Trade Mark Watch, which said Vdio and Hulu filed the trade mark applications on 16 July and 18 July respectively.

As Trade Mark Watch is reporting Hulu’s trade mark application was lodged by the Santa Monica office of ‘Hulu, LLC’ and a Sydney-based legal representative, Davies Collison Cave. The company holds another local trade mark for its name from 2008.

Vdio’s application meanwhile was lodged by the San Francisco office of ‘Vdio, Inc’ and a Canberra-based legal representative, AJ Park.

Both trade mark applications are at the early status of ‘Indexing Approved', meaning a full approval shouldn't be too far away.

Hulu charges its North American subscribers (or anyone internationally who uses a VPN) US$9.95 month for its Hulu Plus service, but still has brief ad breaks, a common complaint of paying users.

Vdio meanwhile is a more modest service, it's a 'sister' service to music streaming site Rdio, and was created Skype and Rdio co-founder Janus Friis in 2011.

The real goliath in the category, TV and movie streaming leader Netflix, has held an Australian trade mark for its logo since October 2012.

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David Swan

David Swan is a tech journalist from Melbourne and is iTWire's Associate Editor. Having started off as a games reviewer at the age of 14, he now has a degree in Journalism from RMIT (with Honours) and owns basically every gadget under the sun.

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